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Fantasy => Promote Your Projects => Ask the Authors and Artists! => Topic started by: David A. Riley on April 03, 2010, 12:06:00 AM

Title: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on April 03, 2010, 12:06:00 AM
I have uploaded the first three chapters of a novel called The Return on my blog ( http://davidandrewriley.blogspot.com/ (http://davidandrewriley.blogspot.com/) ). I would be interested to read any comments anyone who is interested enough to read them would care to make.

If enough people are interested I'll upload further chapters later.
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: Shaun Jeffrey on April 03, 2010, 05:11:59 PM
Good to see you have a board here, David. I'll try to read your chapters over the next couple of days.
Title: Re: A full-blooded, foul-ratted exercise in undiluted horror
Post by: David A. Riley on April 04, 2010, 08:44:00 PM
I was interested to see a review by D. F. Lewis of The Sixth Black Book of Horror, in which my story, Their Cramped Dark World is described as "in your face, brash, gratuitous", "truly horrific" and "For me, the story crawls into this book like one of the story's own monsters crawling into view".

See this link for the full, in depth review of the anthology: http://weirdmonger.blog-city.com/6thbboh.htm (http://weirdmonger.blog-city.com/6thbboh.htm)

Their Cramped Dark World was, in fact, a sort of homage to the late Richard Laymon, hence some of the transatlantic aspects to the story and its lack of conscience. Whether I was successful or not in my original intention is up to others to decide.
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on April 05, 2010, 07:39:18 PM
I have now uploaded up to Chapter 27 of The Return.
http://davidandrewriley.blogspot.com/ (http://davidandrewriley.blogspot.com/)
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on April 06, 2010, 07:24:56 AM
If anyone would like to see the remaining chapters of The Return, I'll send these to anyone interested as an email attachment on request.
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: DFL on April 06, 2010, 10:02:51 PM
Enjoyed your 'Back From The Dead' story (THE TRUE SPIRIT), David. :)

des
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on April 07, 2010, 04:52:58 PM
Thanks, Des.
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on April 07, 2010, 07:30:03 PM
Just received a letter from Otto Penzler, the editor of an anthology due out from Random House's imprint Vintage Books in the States to reprint an old story of mine (After Nightfall, Year's Best Horror Stories 1, 1971). It will be published in The Zombie Archives in 2011.

The book is expected to contain 60 stories and will be approximately 800 pages in a trade paperback edition.
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: Shaun Jeffrey on April 07, 2010, 10:06:09 PM
Money for old rope. Nice.  :D
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on April 07, 2010, 10:33:22 PM
Money for old rope. Nice.  :D

And very nice money too.
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on April 17, 2010, 03:11:53 PM
Received a circulated email from John and Kathy Pelan today with an update on developments at Midnight House/Darkside Press, which has been on a bit of hiatus recently. It now looks as if my short story collection, The Lurkers in the Abyss will definitely be out later this year in the States.

This is part of the message:

"Apologies! It’s been a rather ghastly year for us as I’ve had to sit out a no-compete agreement which has severely curtailed my abilities to earn a living in the mundane world, with a very significant negative impact on our book production. However, I’m back at work now and we expect to (finally) get the third Clifford D. Simak book to press in the next month or so. On the Midnight House side of things we have both Uel Key’s The Broken Fang and Richard Gamon’s The Strange Thirteen ready to go. Expect both by the end of summer.

More new books! This fall should see publication of David Riley’s Lurkers in the Abyss from Midnight House and the long awaited “Best of” William F. Temple from Darkside Press (along with the fourth Simak collection."

The full message can be looked at on my blog.
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: Rolnikov on April 17, 2010, 05:25:46 PM
Good news for you!

Do you think they'd be willing to supply review copies of the Simak books? I've always been a fan of his.
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on April 17, 2010, 05:27:36 PM
"Do you think they'd be willing to supply review copies of the Simak books? I've always been a fan of his."

I'll email John about this for you.

David
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on April 19, 2010, 09:34:02 PM
Just had an update from Cemetery Dance on their long awaited two-volume anthology The Century's Best Horror fiction, edited by John Pelan.

"Cemetery Dance Publications commissioned a spectacular two-volume anthology project under the editorship of noted author and historian of the horror genre, John Pelan.

John selected one story published during each year of the 20th Century (1901-2000) as the most notable story of that year — all 100 stories were then collected in this amazing two volume set to be published as The Century's Best Horror Fiction.

The ground rules were simple: Only one selection per author. Only one selection per year.

Two huge volumes, one hundred authors, one hundred classic stories, over 700,000 words of fiction -- history in the making!"

The latest update says: "As we mentioned last time, after looking at the size of The Dark Tower: The Complete Concordance, and considering that The Century's Best Horror Fiction edited by John Pelan is TWO volumes about that size (706 page and 868 pages), we had a change of heart about not dustjacketing those two volumes. So instead of using Alan M. Clark's incredible paintings as frontispieces, our designer is turning them into dustjackets to protect each book. This will not delay our plans to send the books to the printer this summer. Here are the final designs for the front covers:

(http://www.cemeterydance.com/Merchant2/graphics/00000001/pelan01.gif)

My story The Lurkers in the Abyss represents 1970. The full lineup is:


1901: Barry Pain -- The Undying Thing
1902: W.W. Jacobs -- The Monkey's Paw
1903: H.G.Wells -- The Valley of the Spiders
1904: Arthur Machen -- The White People
1905: R. Murray Gilchrist -- The Lover's Ordeal
1906: Edward Lucas White -- House of the Nightmare
1907: Algernon Blackwood -- The Willows
1908: Perceval Landon -- Thurnley Abbey
1909: Violet Hunt -- The Coach
1910: Wm Hope Hodgson -- The Whistling Room
1911: M.R. James -- Casting the Runes
1912: E.F. Benson -- Caterpillars
1913: Aleister Crowley -- The Testament of Magdelan Blair
1914: M. P. Shiel -- The Place of Pain
1915: Hanns Heinz Ewers -- The Spider
1916: Lord Dunsany -- Thirteen at Table
1917: Frederick Stuart Greene -- The Black Pool
1918: H. De Vere Stacpoole -- The Middle Bedroom
1919: Ulric Daubeny -- The Sumach
1920: Maurice Level -- In the Light of the Red Lamp
1921: Vincent O'Sullivan -- Master of Fallen Years
1922: Walter de la Mare -- Seaton's Aunt
1923: George Allen England -- The Thing from Outside
1924: C.M. Eddy -- The Loved Dead
1925: John Metcalfe -- The Smoking Leg
1926: H.P. Lovecraft -- The Outsider
1927: Donald Wandrei -- The Red Brain
1928: H.R. Wakefield -- The Red Lodge
1929: Eleanor Scott -- Celui-La
1930: Rosalie Muspratt -- Spirit of Stonhenge
1931: Henry S. Whitehead -- Cassius
1932: David H. Keller -- The Thing in the Cellar
1933: C.L. Moore -- Shambleau
1934: L.A. Lewis -- The Tower of Moab
1935: Clark Ashton Smith -- The Dark Eidolon
1936: Thorp McCluskey -- The Crawling Horror
1937: Howard Wandrei -- The Eerie Mr Murphy
1938: Robert E. Howard -- Pigeons from Hell
1939: Robert Barbour Johnson -- Far Below
1940: John Collier -- Evening Primrose
1941: C.M. Kornbluth -- The Words of Guru
1942: Jane Rice -- The Idol of the Flies
1943: Anthony Boucher -- They Bite
1944: Ray Bradbury -- The Jar
1945: August Derleth -- Carousel
1946: Manly Wade Wellman -- Shonokin Town
1947: Theodore Sturgeon -- Bianca's Hands
1948: Shirley Jackson -- The Lottery
1949: Nigel Kneale -- The Pond
1950: Richard Matheson -- Born of Man & Woman
1951: Russell Kirk -- Uncle Isiah
1952: Eric Frank Russell -- I Am Nothing
1953: Robert Sheckley -- The Altar
1954: Everill Worrell -- Call Not Their Names
1955: Robert Aickman -- Ringing the Changes
1956: Richard Wilson -- Lonely Road
1957: Clifford Simak -- Founding Father
1958: Robert Bloch -- That Hell-Bound Train
1959: Charles Beaumont -- The Howling Man
1960: Frederic Brown -- The House
1961: Ray Russell -- Sardonicus
1962: Carl Jacobi -- The Aquarium
1963: Robert Arthur -- The Mirror of Cagliostro
1964: Charles Birkin -- A Lovely Bunch of Coconuts
1965: Jean Ray -- The Shadowy Street
1966: Arthur Porges -- The Mirror
1967: Norman Spinrad -- Carcinoma Angels
1968: Anna Hunger -- Come
1969: Stefan Aletti -- The Last Work of Pietro Apono
1970: David A Riley -- The Lurkers in the Abyss
1971: Dorothy K. Haynes -- The Derelict Track
1972: Gary Brandner -- The Price of a Demon
1973: Eddy C. Bertin -- Like Two White Spiders
1974: Karl Edward Wagner -- Sticks
1975: David Drake -- The Barrow Troll
1976: Dennis Etchison -- It Only Comes Out at Night
1977: Barry Malzberg -- The Man Who Loved the Midnight Lady
1978: Michael Bishop -- Within the Walls of Tyre
1979: Ramsey Campbell -- Mackintosh Willy
1980: Michael Shea -- The Autopsy
1981: Stephen King -- The Reach
1982: Fritz Leiber -- Horrible Imagings
1983: David Schow -- One for the Horrors
1984: Bob Leman -- The Unhappy Pilgrimage of Clifford M
1985: Michael Reaves -- The Night People
1986: Tim Powers -- Night Moves
1987: Ian Watson -- Evil Water
1988: Joe Lansdale -- The Night They Missed the Horror Show
1989: Joel Lane -- The Earth Wire
1990: Elizabeth Massie -- Stephen
1991: Thomas Ligotti -- The Glamour
1992: Poppy Z. Brite -- Calcutta Lord of Nerves
1993: Lucy Taylor -- The Family Underwater
1994: Jack Ketchum -- The Box
1995: Terry Lamsley -- The Toddler
1996: Caitlin R. Kiernan -- Tears Seven, Times Salt
1997: Stephen Laws -- The Crawl
1998: Brian Hodge -- As Above, So Below
1999: Glen Hirshberg -- Mr. Dark's Carnival
2000: Tim Lebbon -- Reconstructing Amy
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: allybird on April 19, 2010, 09:59:01 PM
Blimey David. You must be feeling so proud...just looking at the latter half...Joel Lane, Ian Watson, Poppy Brite, Caitlin Kiernan, and Tim Lebbon..you must be going to bed happy tonight :>).
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on April 19, 2010, 10:14:52 PM
Thanks, Ally. It's quite a list, isn't it?  Not quite sure how I sneaked onto it!

David
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on April 26, 2010, 07:00:41 AM
I don't think many people know about it - I've rarely mentioned it myself - but I do have a fantasy novel available as an e-book. It's called Gobliin Mire and is available from several sources including Amazon and Barnes & Noble: http://search.barnesandnoble.com/Goblin-Mire/David-A-Riley/e/2940000109953 (http://search.barnesandnoble.com/Goblin-Mire/David-A-Riley/e/2940000109953).

There are more details about it on my blog: http://davidandrewriley.blogspot.com/p/novel-goblin-mire.html (http://davidandrewriley.blogspot.com/p/novel-goblin-mire.html)

David
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on May 04, 2010, 08:40:55 AM
It's quite a while now since Renaissance e-books "published" my fantasy novel Goblin Mire and so far it has earned zilch. Whether this is because it's a crap novel or because it has never been promoted enough, I don't know. It is available quite widely, including on Amazon and Barnes & Noble, and on Renaissance e-books' own site, but without much success.

This makes me wonder whether e-books are any kind of answer, certainly without the backup of a printed version as well.

Or is it simply because I have been too lazy in promoting the book and have left it all to the publisher?

David
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: DFL on May 04, 2010, 08:45:37 AM
David,
From my experience, I don't think anyone reads fiction outside of a real book and never will do so. Do you? I don't.
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on May 04, 2010, 08:54:59 AM
Like you, Des, I've never read an e-book in my life and I very much doubt if I ever shall. But recently I did hear from a couple of people who regularly download books onto devices like Kindle. One kind soul even downloaded a copy of Goblin Mire - so I've had at least one sale in the last few weeks!

This was a bit of an experiment. I learned about Renaissance E-Books from a friend, Janre Frank, who then had had quite a few books published by them. And since the owner of Renaissance E-Books expressed an interest in publishing Goblin Mire - and no one else was - what was there to lose? Except there hasn't seemed to have been much to gain either.  ???

David



 
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: Shaun Jeffrey on May 04, 2010, 10:44:33 AM
I've had a number of people ask about a Kindle version of my books, and there have been sales of the PDF version of both of the Leucrota ones, so people do buy them, but not as much as the printed versions.
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: Craig Herbertson on May 04, 2010, 03:23:28 PM
I've never read an e-book in my life but a couple of people bought mine from Immanion Press's site smashwords.com. I wonder if its an age thing. I still struggle with a  mobile phone...
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on May 04, 2010, 03:28:42 PM
Quote
I still struggle with a  mobile phone...

Mine's always dying because I forget to recharge it. On the other hand, I don't use it that much either. So you're probably right, Craig. It could be an age thing.  :-\

David
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: DFL on May 04, 2010, 03:34:10 PM
I think the only way you can judge this is whether anyone admits to regularly buying and reading fiction on some sort of electronic device. If you do, please report here. (Sorry, David. I'm not trying to take over your thread. But it is interesting, I hope you agree).
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on May 04, 2010, 10:26:24 PM

Quote
I think the only way you can judge this is whether anyone admits to regularly buying and reading fiction on some sort of electronic device. If you do, please report here. (Sorry, David. I'm not trying to take over your thread. But it is interesting, I hope you agree).

To get a proper idea I suppose it would be better to set up a thread somewhere dedicated to it. But I agree with you, Des, it would be interesting to find out just how many or, perhaps, what kind of a percentage of people make use of electronic reading devices.

David
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: Rolnikov on May 05, 2010, 08:54:55 AM
A year ago Amazon said that where books were available in paper and Kindle format, the Kindle format was accounting for 35% of sales.
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on May 05, 2010, 09:02:09 AM
That's an interesting bit of information, Stephen, especially since Amazon is either already the biggest or one of the biggest internet booksellers in the world.

Of course, at the end of the day, the publisher's name is going to have an impact on overall sales - and the amount of time spent on promoting a book, both by the publisher and author.

I get the impression these days authors have got to take a much more proactive role in promotion than may have been the case some years ago. I was speaking to an editor from a major publisher at the Stoker Banquet in Brighton and she stressed how important it is now for an author to get their name across on the net, through blogs, twitter, etc.

David
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: DFL on May 05, 2010, 09:02:48 AM
That''s interesting, Stephen. I wonder if those people bought any more kindles a year later or was it a case of trying out a novelty?
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: Rolnikov on May 05, 2010, 11:57:29 AM
That was 18 months after the Kindle's release, Des. Christmas Day was when you really saw the novelty effect, when Kindle format sales on Amazon actually overtook paper sales for a day.
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: DFL on May 05, 2010, 12:02:52 PM
It is still a novelty idea with most of the public, I guess.
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: Mike Chinn on May 05, 2010, 02:52:00 PM
It is still a novelty idea with most of the public, I guess.

Words printed on pages - not hand-crafted by monks... Now that's a novelty  ;D
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on May 05, 2010, 04:11:18 PM
Someone posted a link to this article on Shocklines, which I thought highly pertinent to the discussion going on here - though it's a discussion that perhaps warrants a thread somewhere of its own.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/michael-a-stackpole/publishing-crashes-in-201_b_532795.html (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/michael-a-stackpole/publishing-crashes-in-201_b_532795.html)

David
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: Rolnikov on May 05, 2010, 05:37:48 PM
Sounds about right to me. I doubt publishers will entirely die, though. Every author putting out books now could do it themselves on Lulu if they wanted, but they don't because they feel publishers have something to offer - polish, publicity, gravitas, all that stuff. I don't think that'll change.
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: Peter Coleborn on May 05, 2010, 05:50:11 PM
Sounds about right to me. I doubt publishers will entirely die, though. Every author putting out books now could do it themselves on Lulu if they wanted, but they don't because they feel publishers have something to offer - polish, publicity, gravitas, all that stuff. I don't think that'll change.

Without publishers (and their editors, I'd say) who would proof read the manuscript and remove excessive commas?  :D
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on May 19, 2010, 11:28:17 PM
Since posting some comments on the issue of self publishing and e-books I have been emailed by Joubert Nel, co-founder of Fifobooks, who specialise in ebooks. http://fifobooks.com/ (http://fifobooks.com/)

The interesting details about this site are that it is an ebook marketplace where the authors:

retain all the rights to their work

maintain full editorial control

set the price at which their ebooks are sold, and keep the majority of the revenue

there is no fee to publish

Anyway, I am looking into this with regard, perhaps, to an older unpublished horror novel I wrote some years ago. It could be a worthwhile experiment. Certainly there would be nothing to lose, though first I must go through the manuscript very carefully to ferret out any typos, etc. Further on this later.

David
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: Rolnikov on May 20, 2010, 08:35:35 AM
You have to create your own ebook for them, which isn't great, and you won't get any payment at all until sales reach $200, which seems rather dodgy to me. You'd get a better deal with Lulu, though you'd still have to create your own epub file.

The thing that makes Feedbooks so handy is that you paste your text into it in a standard form, and then their site outputs it in whatever format is required - and it also feeds into various other pieces of reading software that draw from it, like Stanza. The downside of course for someone who wants to make money from their writing is that you can't sell through Feedbooks yet, only give away.
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on May 20, 2010, 08:43:17 AM
"You have to create your own ebook for them, which isn't great"

I had a look into this, including the links they provide to free downloads for doing this, and that isn't too difficult. It only took me a short while to get a full novel set up. The only thing left now is to proof read it carefully - again not an issue. Writers really do need to get experienced at this. It's dodgy - as I have learned - to leave this to publishers.

"and you won't get any payment at all until sales reach $200, which seems rather dodgy to me"

This does seem a bigger issue to me. In fact, the issue of royalties from e-books in general seems a big one to me. How reliable are the figures by e-book publishers and marketeers? Are they even less reliable than from normal hard copy publishers?

David

Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: Rolnikov on May 20, 2010, 08:56:08 AM
Creating an ebook is quite easy, but it's like any kind of typesetting - anyone can do it, but it doesn't necessarily mean the results are going to be optimal. Feedbooks can tweak the formatting of all the books on their service at once. Fifobooks aren't really a digital publishing platform, they're people who sell individual files - you could do exactly the same thing yourself on your website and keep 100% of the money.

Or the BFS could do it on our website (there's an idea!)

The difference between something like this and Feedbooks is that if a new device comes out, requiring a new format, or allowing new typesetting features, Feedbooks can make every book on their website available in that format all at once. With something like this (and Lulu do it the same way), every user would have to create a new file to sell in that format.
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on May 20, 2010, 09:37:13 AM
Thanks for that, Stephen.

The ebook format does, anyway, look like something to be thought about very seriously today. It's obviously a venue that more and more people are using to read off, therefore it's something for writers to consider using to get published on.

I have started to use a novel which, though I like it myself, is perhaps a bit too old fashioned for most publishers to look at today, including most small press publishers. I think I might see how this goes down in the ebook format. If that does okay, it's a good enough sign to me that other stuff could go that way too.

It will be fun to mess about with it whatever the outcome - and some useful lessons could be learned from it.

David
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: Craig Herbertson on May 20, 2010, 09:40:55 AM
Good point David. I have an old horror novel that looks a it like its simply out of fashion rather than no good at all. I might think about this method.
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on May 20, 2010, 09:45:36 AM
Why not, Craig?  There doesn't seem anything to lose, providing we only use something that won't harm our own reputations - ie something shoddily written. (Of course there could be some who'd say that about the best of mine, but, hey ho...)  ;D

David
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: Rolnikov on May 20, 2010, 09:55:35 AM
Bear in mind too that a lot of these places don't demand exclusivity - so you can put your ebook on Fifobooks, Lulu, Smashwords (I think it is) and on your own website too - and Amazon's Digital Text Platform, once it's available in the UK.
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: Craig Herbertson on May 20, 2010, 11:19:35 AM
Some how I get a Pandora feeling  :)
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on May 24, 2010, 07:05:27 AM
I was sent this link to Smashwords as an example of where self publushing can go wrong. I think the text will explain itself.

http://www.smashwords.com/books/view/15091
 (http://www.smashwords.com/books/view/15091)

But, at the end of the day, word of mouth and an author's reputation will decide whose books are downloaded and whose will forever remain on the shelf. Which is why it is important that an author makes sure that anything they have published online is checked, not only by the author themself, but to overcome their weaknesses - which may be spelling, grammar, bad habits, etc - they are thoroughly proofread and critically reviewed by other reliable people.
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: Rolnikov on May 24, 2010, 07:21:48 AM
It's pretty much the same as self-publishing a physical book, basically, with one marvellous difference - you can easily fix a mistake once someone points it out.

I'm always surprised that more writers don't ask for a Word version of their books (or stories) at the end of the publishing process. If you have that in hand, it makes it so much easier when you want to do another edition, or a collection.

Once or twice I've seen stories I've published collected in books and been a little frustrated to see mistakes I'd fixed re-appearing...
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on May 25, 2010, 08:52:21 AM
I have finally finished rewiting Sendings, reducing it from 81,000 words to 76,000. It's a bit of a mad novel, originally written years ago, a mixture of two influences at the time: H. P. Lovecraft and Dennis Wheatley. I doubt if you could get much madder than that!

I don't claim any literary merits for the thing (any what?) but I hope it's entertaining enough for anyone who reads it.

The full novel is now available on my blog. http://davidandrewriley.blogspot.com/p/novel-sendings.html (http://davidandrewriley.blogspot.com/p/novel-sendings.html)

Don't say you've not been warned.  :-\

David
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on May 30, 2010, 08:59:23 AM
I have posted the opening chapters to a novel I am working on at the moment called Lucilla. It's a bit of a departure for me and I would be interested to hear what anyone who cares to take a read of it has to say. It is, though, a horror novel with supernatural elements.

I would add, it is some months yet away from being finished.

David

Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on June 04, 2010, 07:17:03 AM
Sendings is now available as an e-book from Fifobooks:  https://www.fifobooks.com/Catalog?bkid=184ed261-9a77-4355-b648-53f39b171b7e (https://www.fifobooks.com/Catalog?bkid=184ed261-9a77-4355-b648-53f39b171b7e)

I am doing this very much as an experiment to see how it works out, which is why I have chosen to use an old, unpublished novel.  I am covering how things develop on my blog.

Interestingly, FifoBooks have emailed me with a widget to add to my website, plus advice to

Tell your friends on Facebook

Post a tweet on Twitter


Which will be an experience in itself as I have never used either yet!  ???

This is the cover I have put together:

(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_tsO8Svtm0pM/TAgwWQyQLiI/AAAAAAAAALU/TqJZzphQ2VY/s320/Sendings+cover.jpg)

David[/list]
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on June 05, 2010, 02:41:37 PM
I hjave now put my novella from Houses on the Borderland, The Worst of all Possible Places, on FifoBooks as a free download, and changed the cover for Sendings.

https://www.fifobooks.com/Catalog?bkid=6d2be485-a66a-4caf-8317-0c4f416483c5 (https://www.fifobooks.com/Catalog?bkid=6d2be485-a66a-4caf-8317-0c4f416483c5) and https://www.fifobooks.com/Catalog?bkid=901cd291-4a05-48b7-81b6-cad89f4d20ef (https://www.fifobooks.com/Catalog?bkid=901cd291-4a05-48b7-81b6-cad89f4d20ef)

(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_tsO8Svtm0pM/TApSu2GFAMI/AAAAAAAAANk/UATvs3VYUz0/s320/Cover+)  (http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_tsO8Svtm0pM/TApS3awcYiI/AAAAAAAAANs/u1_3c2Whbtw/s320/The+worst+of+all+possible+places.JPG)

https://www.fifobooks.com/covers/6d2be485-a66a-4caf-8317-0c4f416483c5.png

My theory is that, with one as a free download, this gives a sample of my work and could lead to some people going on to download the novel too for $1.99.

Well, that's the theory anyway.


David
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on June 10, 2010, 08:11:15 PM
After a few days these are the results on FifoBooks so far:

The Worst of All Possible Places has risen from 6 to 12 downloads
Their Own Mad Demons, which hadn't sold any yesterday, has had 4 downloads
Sendings has risen from 1 to 2 downloads.

Apart from Sendings these are free downloads.

A new thread has started on Shocklines (http://shocklinesforum.yuku.com/topic/15339 (http://shocklinesforum.yuku.com/topic/15339)) on this subject, which is very interesting. Keith Goeveia, in particular, seems to have done well on Amazon. As a result I have now put Sendings and The Worst of All Possible Places on that site too, though it will be another 48 hours before they appear.
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on June 12, 2010, 12:08:31 AM
Sendings http://www.amazon.com/Sendings-ebook/dp/B003R4ZA10/ref=sr_1_9?ie=UTF8&m=A7B2F8DUJ88VZ&s=digital-text&qid=1276295544&sr=1-9 (http://www.amazon.com/Sendings-ebook/dp/B003R4ZA10/ref=sr_1_9?ie=UTF8&m=A7B2F8DUJ88VZ&s=digital-text&qid=1276295544&sr=1-9) and The Worst of All Possible Places http://www.amazon.com/Worst-All-Possible-Places-ebook/dp/B003R4Z6KU/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&m=A7B2F8DUJ88VZ&s=digital-text&qid=1276295891&sr=1-1 (http://www.amazon.com/Worst-All-Possible-Places-ebook/dp/B003R4Z6KU/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&m=A7B2F8DUJ88VZ&s=digital-text&qid=1276295891&sr=1-1) are now available on Amazon.com as Kindle downloads.

Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on June 14, 2010, 08:54:27 AM
Kev Demant, the host of Vault of Evil, has just written an article about the magazine I published in 1995, Beyond, which ran for three issues, publishing the likes of John Brunner, Karl Wagner, Ramsey Campbell, Simon Clark, Stephen Laws, etc.

http://vaultofevil.proboards.com/index.cgi?action=display&board=horrormags&thread=3770&page=1 (http://vaultofevil.proboards.com/index.cgi?action=display&board=horrormags&thread=3770&page=1)

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v683/panspersons/beyond1-1.jpg)

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v683/panspersons/beyond2nd600.jpg)

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v683/panspersons/beyond3-1.jpg)
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on July 02, 2010, 09:09:44 AM
To bring it in line with its presence on FifoBooks, I have reduced the price of my ebook novel Sendings on Amazon to $1.99.

http://www.amazon.com/Sendings-ebook/dp/B003R4ZA10/ref=sr_1_9?ie=UTF8&m=A7B2F8DUJ88VZ&s=digital-text&qid=1276295544&sr=1-9 (http://www.amazon.com/Sendings-ebook/dp/B003R4ZA10/ref=sr_1_9?ie=UTF8&m=A7B2F8DUJ88VZ&s=digital-text&qid=1276295544&sr=1-9)

(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_tsO8Svtm0pM/TApSu2GFAMI/AAAAAAAAANk/UATvs3VYUz0/s320/Cover+)
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on July 10, 2010, 10:25:38 AM
I just received my contributor's copy of Filthy Creations 6 through the post this morning from Rog Pile, its editor and publisher, and what a superb looking publication it is! It looks much better than I expected and I am pleased to have my novel Sendings serialised in it.

Other contributors include Craig Herbertson (with a serialisation of his novel The Death Tableau), Charles Black (who really should put more of his own stories in the Black Books of Horror), D. F. Lewis, Stephen Bacon, Robert Mammone, Franklin Marsh, Colin Leslie, James Stanger, and Penni McClaren Walker, with illustrations by Rog Pile. With a line up like that I am looking forward to reading the magazine.

(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4024/4693293631_5d791f1ba3.jpg)

http://filthycreations.proboards.com/ (http://filthycreations.proboards.com/)

To order a copy click on this: http://filthycreations.yolasite.com/fc6.php (http://filthycreations.yolasite.com/fc6.php)


Or email Rog Pile at rogpile (at) hotmail (dot) co (dot) uk
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on July 22, 2010, 08:47:27 AM
I write like... Cory Doctorow, David Foster Wallace, William Gibson and Stephen King!

Well, that's according to this little online test. http://iwl.me/ (http://iwl.me/)

It's good fun and could make an amusing party game (at a party for just writers of course since anyone else would be bored silly).

Anyway, I'm just relieved it didn't say I write like Nicholas Pacione (and if you've never seen his writing you've never lived!) Hmmm, I wonder what his answer would be. Possibly William Burroughs during his cut and paste period?

It's daft but amusing.
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: Rolnikov on July 22, 2010, 10:08:30 AM
Oh dear, wish you hadn't mentioned his name! Hope he doesn't show up on here now...

I actually wrote an entire novel inspired by him a few years ago, during NaNoWriMo.... The character developed a language bomb to destroy everyone else's ability to write coherent sentences, making him the best writer in the world by default....
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on July 22, 2010, 10:12:10 AM
That only happens if you say his name three times. A bit like candyman but worse.  :o
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on July 22, 2010, 10:13:25 AM
An entire novel about the Pacione monster? He must have made a big impression on you.  Sounds brilliant!
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: Rolnikov on July 22, 2010, 10:30:05 AM
My greatest talent as a writer is writing novels that sound brilliant but are in fact very much not...
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: Craig Herbertson on July 24, 2010, 01:50:17 PM
My greatest talent as a writer is writing novels that sound brilliant but are in fact very much not...

 :) know the feeling
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on July 28, 2010, 08:57:07 AM
I have put my novel Sendings on https://www.fifobooks.com/Catalog?bkid=6d2be485-a66a-4caf-8317-0c4f416483c5 (https://www.fifobooks.com/Catalog?bkid=6d2be485-a66a-4caf-8317-0c4f416483c5) as a free download for a limited period.

If anyone reads it, perhaps they would consider putting a review of it on the Amazon site:http://www.amazon.com/Sendings-ebook/dp/B003R4ZA10/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&m=A7B2F8DUJ88VZ&s=digital-text&qid=1276676076&sr=1-3 (http://www.amazon.com/Sendings-ebook/dp/B003R4ZA10/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&m=A7B2F8DUJ88VZ&s=digital-text&qid=1276676076&sr=1-3)
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: Craig Herbertson on August 04, 2010, 01:15:12 PM
I tried David but The choice of downloads seems to lead to applications I don't have on my computer
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on August 04, 2010, 02:08:00 PM
I tried David but The choice of downloads seems to lead to applications I don't have on my computer

That's something I hate. You spend ages downloading stuff you never thought you needed and can't ever see much of a change afterwards anyway.
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: Craig Herbertson on August 04, 2010, 03:55:30 PM
Luckily I discovered that the icon on the download in the Mozilla Firefox shows if the item is an application you  have. So you don't spend an hour downloading it only to discover that you can't read it. Still Frustrating.

The worst I find is when people send me stuff on some version of word or excel and then I find out I can't convert it. Born in the wrong age.
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: Rolnikov on August 04, 2010, 05:51:15 PM
Craig, if you want to read David's book on your computer, Stanza for Desktop (http://www.lexcycle.com/desktop) will let you read the epub version.
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on August 14, 2010, 11:57:58 AM
There's been a debate on the Horror Writers Association boards about self publishing and POD - something that was anathema there until recently. Times are changing, though, even at the HWA.

My reply to the debate was as follows:

I have begun to believe that certainly with collections of short stories POD may be the only answer for most writers, since mainstream publishers have little interest in short story collections for anyone outside a small circle of big name writers. The only alternative till recently has been to go to small presses for these, but with so many unreliable small presses around, I wonder whether most writers would be better off turning to POD instead. At least then they have full control over what their collection looks like - and will certainly collect more royalties from its sale.
 
I have had a collection of stories - all of them previously professionally published either in anthologies or magazines - in the pipeline with one previously quite prestigious small press for several years - and with still no certainty of when it will appear. This is after it was originally going to be published by another small press that folded. After this, I am seriously considering publishing it myself, commissioning an extremely good artist for the cover (I already have one in mind) and bringing out both a hard and paperback version, with an ebook to follow. 
 
At least all the stories have been through the mill and been judged by others to be worthy of professional publication in the past (in fact one has been chosen to be reprinted professionally in a mass market paperback next year). 
 
I am sick and tired of relying upon unreliable small presses and am now prepared to take on the task myself, something I would not have even considered some time ago. 
 
 
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: Degsy on August 15, 2010, 12:21:09 AM
The exponential increase in online bust-ups and flame-wars relating to various small presses over the last year or so has graphically highlighted the stresses and faultlines that are developing in the current publishing paradigm.

It's clear that we are witnessing the last days of the small press as we know it, but whatever takes its place is still unclear. I suspect that what will follow will resemble in part what has already occurred in the world of music (i.e. selling tracks off Myspace, online gigs etc), with blogging and self-promotion providing the stepping stone to greater things.

My own view is that we will still have the 'boutique' presses producing small limited editions for collectors but that most publications will be online or via e-book sales. Already several of the authors on this forum seem to be selling more copies via the Kindle/Smashwords than via traditional paper and ink.

Unless you're an established author (or manage to generate enough online buzz) self-publishing is probably a tough road to take and the author is invariably the least qualified person to edit their own work. Hopefully, we will see the number of reputable online publishers steadily increase and the low overheads and quick turnaround should mean that the days of disappearing anthologies and 'promises promises' are at an end.

Ben at speculativefictionjunkie.com posted an article recently on a similar theme which sparked off an interesting philosophical debate in the comments field with responses from Simon Strantzas and Quentin S. Crisp - well worth a read for anyone who's interested.
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: brendanconnell on August 15, 2010, 05:23:29 AM
There have always been bust-ups and flame wars in the small press scene. I have seen presses come. I have seen presses go. But from where I am standing now, the small press "scene" seems more healthy than it has ever been.

E-book sales are all fine and good, but certainly most people want a physical book. Especially people interested in fantastic literature.

Negativity is a glorious thing, but unless one can back it up with numbers and examples, it is sort of meaningless. Real book sales dwarf e-book sales. Many small presses have started up in the last year. Many that have been around have grown stronger. Yes, a few have fallen by the wayside. But the numbers of active and interesting small presses has been increasing, not diminishing.
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: Rolnikov on August 15, 2010, 06:07:15 AM
I agree with you about the small press scene, Brendan. And ebooks are good for small presses. Take distribution and economies of scale out of the picture and running a small press becomes financially much more feasible. They can now afford to price an ebook more cheaply than a big publisher, whereas POD books would typically be a few quid more than an equivalent paperback.

Small presses could do very well in this environment, I think - as long as they continue to add value to what the author could do on their own.
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: brendanconnell on August 15, 2010, 07:15:38 AM
Hi Stephen,

I am not against e-books. I am more saying that an e-book alone might not be the best strategy for getting one's work read.

The most difficult part of these ventures, it seems to me, is to get people to know about the book. Since most reviewers won’t accept digital formats (though some, like yourself, thankfully do), it is difficult to have people know about the work without having physical copies to put into their hands.

I have mulled over the self-publishing strategy a good bit. But in the end, I have decided for myself at least, that I would rather not do it. It is true that a publisher takes part of the money for the sales, but it is also true that they do something for this money. They (ideally) support the author, design the book, take care of distribution etc. This is a tremendous amount of work. Furthermore, they put up the money to get the thing off to the printers.

And writing is such a solitary occupation as it is, that it is nice to have some human contact once the book is actually written.

I don’t disparage self publishing, but I do think having some kind of a team behind you when the book is launched out into the world can be extremely helpful, especially if you have a publisher/editor who is willing to work with you.

E-books of course can be part of this package, but launching an e-book from one’s living room is still likely to be less gratifying than doing something through a good press, small or large.

This of course does not mean that there are not exceptions – people who can and do work better on their own. But for most of us, the human contact and teamwork is beneficial.

Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: Rolnikov on August 15, 2010, 08:00:45 AM
I'd agree with all of that.  ;D
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: Degsy on August 15, 2010, 11:52:51 AM
Hi Brendan,

I'm coming at this from a reader's perspective and I'm not being negative about small presses per se - just about how their actual readership seems to be dwindling and dwindling to the point where the principal market for some books seems to consist mainly of genre authors themselves and collectors.

For instance, three writers who I greatly admire: Quentin S. Crisp, Reggie Oliver and Mark Samuels, have all chosen to release their last collections with boutique publishers who charge premium prices in print runs of <200 copies. For example, if you want to get hold of Crisp's now out of print 'Morbid Tales' from Tartarus you're looking at £70-100 from a specialist dealer. With prices like these an entire generation of fans is being disenfranchised.

In general, I tend to buy more books from UK and Canadian presses so I can't really comment on the US scene but I think the problem people have with e-books is that we are genuinely in a transitional period with a certain amount of Luddite-ism and all the stresses and strains that entails. As things become more settled, I'm sure that reviewers at the bigger publications will be forced by their readership to take e-books as seriously as the physical ones.

My sources for the increase in e-book sales are purely anecdotal and also based on my own purchasing habits. For example, on this forum Willie Meikle has a book in the top twenty SF books on Amazon Kindle which I assume must be selling more than any of his other print titles. There is no reason why the small presses I admire shouldn't take as much care and time over crafting e-books as they do the real ones (and some already do).

As for self-publishing, it seems that lessons from the music industry are there to see. If you're an established writer like David with all the necessary connections and a ready-made fanbase then self-publishing is a real option (compare say a well-known band like the Beatles leaving a major label and setting up their own Apple records). When it comes to the donkey work of lugging suitcases of books from con to con and sitting at your lonely dealer's table watching the punters pass by that you begin to appreciate all that extras that a small press has to do and it kind of takes the sheen off self-publishing!

I suspect e-books will revolutionise the way authors market themselves and maybe make self-publishing a viable route for some, but I agree that certainly for a budding writer it isn't the best way to go, the mentoring and support a good editor and publisher can give is priceless.
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: brendanconnell on August 15, 2010, 03:51:16 PM
Hi Degsy,

I understand what you are saying. My opinion with Crisp, Oliver and Samuels though is that they probably builit their audiences by having those limited print run books, because those can often lead to a few dedicated readers. Being published by a place like Tartarus, strategically, can be very helpful to an author.

I should note that all three of those authors also have books either out, or forthcoming from Chomu Press. Crisp's book is only £11.00, so I assume the Samuels and Oliver titles will also be reasonably priced.
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: Degsy on August 15, 2010, 04:49:27 PM
I've got 'Remember You're a One-Ball' on order from Amazon at the moment so I'll reserve judgement on the Chomu Press until it arrives.

Obviously I can't speak for Crisp, Samuels et al and I can't gainsay the fact that Tartarus Press and Ex-Occidente volumes are sumptuous masterpieces of the bookbinders art, but they clearly play to a niche market and I'm surprised that authors with such a high critical reputation would seek to ghetto-ise themelves from a mainstream audience in such a way - although I do note that Tartarus have now put out a cheap paperback edition of 'The White Hands' printed by Biddles.

It might have something to do with another point raised by both yourself and Stephen about the 'healthy' small press scene. It's true that there are probably more small presses around now than say, ten years ago and a large part of this is due to the rise in POD publishing. This is, of course, a good thing, and I see a lot of worthy outfits springing-up which are basically one-man POD operations (genuinely selfless individuals who are hardly doing it for the money) and who are helping a lot of budding writers get into print.

Unfortunately, this proliferation may be a double-edged sword. As a reader I have definitely noticed a drop in quality control over the last year or so, not necessarily from the big players on the scene but when buying books from new presses whose work I was not familiar with. It pains me to fork out on average £10-12 for a POD paperback, often from an author I have admired from reading online or wherever, and then to receive something which looks cheap, has clearly not been professionally copyedited, is full of typos and often with poorly reproduced cover art which is of 'semi-professional' quality at best.

Personally, I would rather see a small press pay a professional copyeditor to prepare a properly edited e-book than use the money to bring out a substandard print edition.
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: brendanconnell on August 15, 2010, 05:29:57 PM
You’ve got some good points Degsy.

The one problem is that I don’t think someone would spend the money on copyediting an e-book, who wouldn’t also be willing to spring for printing. In other words, I think with the e-book, you will still have the same problems, because I don’t think anyone who is putting out something on e-book alone is paying for a copy editor.

As for design, I don’t doubt there are a lot of poor ones out there. The small presses I have worked with have all done good work though. I know Eibonvale, who put out my most recent collection, put considerable time into the design.

I think an ideal model for a small press might be to do something like a limited edition hardcover, POD paperback, and e-book. That would sort of cover all the bases, and could probably be done for relatively cheap, if the hardcover was an edition of 150 or 200 copies.
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: Degsy on August 15, 2010, 05:58:43 PM
Sounds like an eminently sensible compromise to me. Some presses (like Atomic Fez for instance) seem to be embracing this already which can only be a good thing. The main advantage in putting out an e-book edition for me is that it means the book is never 'out of print'.

I'm sure I'm not alone in using anthologies like 'The Mammoth Books' to introduce me to new writers and it's often been my experience that when I read a story that I like (and given the lag between its first publication and its subsequent anthologization) that the original collection has gone out of print and can't be had for love or money. This happened with the first Simon Strantzas collection which thankfully is now being reissued by a different publisher many years later. :D
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on August 16, 2010, 08:30:17 AM
"I think an ideal model for a small press might be to do something like a limited edition hardcover, POD paperback, and e-book. That would sort of cover all the bases, and could probably be done for relatively cheap, if the hardcover was an edition of 150 or 200 copies."

I agree with you on this 100%.

On the HWA site, Joe Nassise responded to my comment about unreliable small presses by stating that, because collections of short stories are not commercially viable (in his view), the small presses that publish them are "unreliable" because they obviously don't understand the "economics of book-selling" in publishing them. I don't agree with this. Indeed, to me small presses serve the reading public best by being prepared to publish commercially less attractive books such as one-author collections and anthologies, things of which mainstream publishers are much more wary and are less prepared to touch.

Not all small presses are unreliable, but my experience so far has, I must admit, not been particularly encouraging. That could, of course, just be sheer bad luck.

Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: DavidJHowe on August 16, 2010, 12:01:52 PM
Fascinating discussion ... For Telos Publishing's part, we discovered that, no matter how hard we tried, we could not sell enough fiction to break even.  The up front costs were too high, and the sales were too low.  So we had to take the hard decision to stop doing fiction in order to save the company!

We still dabble from time to time - we did a Simon Clark Novella for WHC this year, and have a couple of excellent Graham Masterton stories out later this year (hopefully in time for FCon), but these only just manage to break even for us. Or they make a loss which we are just about able to absorb. We have to be careful.

It would be wonderful to be able to run a press which allowed one to publish what was great and good and worthy without having to worry about sales at all ... but unfortunately the reality for most presses is that if sales are low, then publishing that sort of title cannot be justified in terms of time, effort, and return on all that time and effort.

Digital sounds good, but there are still set up costs to consider ... and what about a cover?  If you want a nice piece of art to go with the book, then that needs to be paid for ...  Otherwise you don't bother and use a bit of clip art or something for the various sites ... and then what?  The Digital book just sits there. Unless you spend money to advertise it ... and where does that money come from?

Also there's the question of author's advance.  We always try and offer an advance at Telos  ... but with digital, you have no way of assessing the sales when you're starting out ... so do you offer some up front money or not?

How can you have a launch for a digital book?  How can you sell copies of a digital book at a convention?  Do you give them all away and risk making no money on the deal whatsoever?  It's a hard thing to try and get your head around.  We have found that an author launch, with copies, is the best way to sell. Aside from this, few people seem interested or bothered to order a book online from a publisher.  We have published some titles where we gave away more review copies than we actually sold of the book!  We lost money on those.

We have even tried the limited edition hardcover route for fiction, but didn't get enough pre-orders to justify the up front cost and so had to cancel the plans.

I'd like to think that Telos is a very reliable press - we've been going 10 years, and customers seem very happy with what we do and the service we offer - but reliability does have to go hand in hand with realism. Finding out what works and playing to your strengths is always good, but sometimes you have to make hard decisions and stop doing what loses you money if you want to survive.

David
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: allybird on August 16, 2010, 01:03:45 PM
I'd agree with David Howe. When Steve Upham of Screaming Dreams was seriously ill in hospital and I helped promote my collection for launch I found more sales came from conventions etc than online selling. If you have little money for promotion and distribution then the convention circuit is the only way to go, really...and it isn't easy.
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: allybird on August 16, 2010, 01:30:47 PM
Convention 'circuit' ....for that there is Fantasycon, Alt. Fiction, Newcon, Eastercon....etc. I went to all of those the other year. I'll be going to The World Horror Convention in Texas next year. Can't afford World Fantasy in Ohio this year.
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on August 16, 2010, 01:34:44 PM
I have to admire your stamina, Ally, in going to all these conventions, but didn't attending them cost far more than was made in book sales? I ask because, after all, conventions aren't cheap. Did you book tables at these conventions, too?

Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: allybird on August 16, 2010, 02:41:12 PM
Hi David,

'I have to admire your stamina, Ally, in going to all these conventions, but didn't attending them cost far more than was made in book sales?'
Yes but for me it isn't all about the money from book sales. I actually like travelling around and meeting people.

By the time we'd got further down the line to launch at Fantasycon Steve was well enough...so he had a Screaming Dreams table at Fantasycon. We sold 56 copies. For Newcon the dealers' 'tables' were the old fish slabs in the market. I can't remember the cost of that..very little. At Eastercon one of the small press tables put a few copies on their table. The British Fantasy Society hold book launches...at their open nights. You could launch in a northern venue..anyone can organise launch nights/open nights for authors. You could get a few authors together who are launching at the same time and use the York Brewery for instance or nearer to you.

Gary McMahon, John Travis and I held an evening of ghost stories in my home town (in a pub where the room was free and the landlady had the profits from drinks etc) I sold a few copies there.

Is any of the above any help to you?
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on August 16, 2010, 02:54:47 PM
Many thanks, Ally. That's a great insight.
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: brendanconnell on August 16, 2010, 03:53:13 PM
Just to address two of the above mentioned issues:

1) reliability of the small presses. I have dealt with many presses, small and large. There are a few small presses that are very unreliable. The frustration of working with these is pretty high. But at the same time, on average, the small presses are as reliable as the large. The most reliable press I have ever worked with is Tartarus. There level of professionalism certainly matches any large press.

2) Sales of fiction. I think that in order to sell a book these days, it takes a lot of hard work, as Ally has said. It is not enough to just print it and sit back and watch the sales come. Most likely they won't. I also think, on the editor's part, a small press that is willing to take a few chances is more likely to succeed. The large presses have the unexciting fiction bag pretty well sown up. It is up to the small presses to break new ground, in a good way. Many small presses simply make bad choices on what they publish. Which is not to say they publish awful work. But a small press actually needs to publish better work than a large one - because they are already working with both hands tied behind their backs.
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: brendanconnell on August 16, 2010, 03:56:41 PM
...sewn that is...
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: allybird on August 16, 2010, 04:19:28 PM
And in the brief time I spent helping my publisher Steve I found out much about what a small press has to face. Waterstones, on a new writer from a small press, would probably cream 57% off the top. (Steve didn't go for that and I didn't blame him). So there was some money for the author, artist and publisher but it leaves you looking for distribution. And most of all you need a good looking product. Steve used one of the best printers Biddles (not excessive in cost) and luckily Vinnie had just designed my website for me so the extra cost for the cover for Bull Running for Girls was less.

Two years on and I think it obviously must be harder now in the recession. Online sales will be even poorer. And the small press (especially with horror) have the difficult choice of either paying the large distributors the heavy percentage ( I can't remember what Amazon asked but it will be out of date now) or remain very small, indeed, with little room for expansion, and dwindling sales.

And if you don't find a method you can afford for distribution/marketing that works/that you are prepared to do...you might aswell just put the print run in a cupboard because no one is going to even know that it has been published.
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: petercgreen on August 16, 2010, 04:22:12 PM
small presses are great but they do seem to publish more and more expensive versions. nice if you have the money. but for regular editions, not seeing the product before buying is tricky -- can't tell the quality of the book. i've heard that pod books can be shoddy affairs.
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on August 16, 2010, 04:29:13 PM
"Waterstones, on a new writer from a small press, would probably cream 57% off the top. (Steve didn't go for that and I didn't blame him)."

I faced the same kind of distribution costs with a magazine fifteen years ago. We only got something in the low forty percents from the likes of Smiths, etc. Unfortunately, just to make things worse, there were what they called returns, though why they used that word I'll never know, since nothing, not even a ripped off front cover as proof, is ever returned to you. You just have to accept the accuracy of their figures when they dump what's unsold into a skip somewhere. (This actually, in several of their warehouses, resulted in returns that were larger than what they had ordered and been sent! ie 120 copies returned on a delivery of 100 - so much for creative accountancy!)

If the 57% cream off was for firm orders with no returns involved, that would have been a much better deal than I had. At least you would know exactly how much you were going to get. As to whether this would have still made economic sense or not is something else.



Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on August 16, 2010, 04:33:49 PM
small presses are great but they do seem to publish more and more expensive versions. nice if you have the money. but for regular editions, not seeing the product before buying is tricky -- can't tell the quality of the book. i've heard that pod books can be shoddy affairs.


POD books vary. Most I've seen have been fine. It all depends on the creative abilities of the small press publisher - how well they can lay out the original for the printer to work off, the cover chosen and their designing skills. A shoddy POD is almost certainly the fault of the small press publisher. Lightning and, especially, Biddles turn out some excellent books in terms of printing quality.

A lot of small presses do produce rather expensive books, well out of the reach of most people. (I just bought one for over a hundred pounds.) Which is why I personally like the format someone suggested earlier of a limited hardback print run for collectors, then a POD paperback for readers, with an ebook version to cap it off.
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: DavidJHowe on August 16, 2010, 05:14:40 PM
I suspect the reason for the high price tag is to try and recoup costs. As I say, when Telos tried that recently, we had to cancel the edition as there were not sufficient pre-orders, and we couldn't afford to take a chance. It was much cheaper to do a 'normal' paperback edition with a reasonable rrp and sell more of those. Less risky as well.

If the press is relying on sales of the hardback to make back the costs of the printing, then they have to be selling a fair number, and it's only really going to be books by established, name authors who are collectible enough to enable that to happen.  John Doe isn't going to command high prices for his first collection or novel now is he ...

On convention sales, that's a good point about the cost of attending cons. If you are planning to go to them anyway, then that's fair, as you would have been spending the money anyway, but in my experience (and this includes large DOCTOR WHO conventions as well as smaller affairs like FantasyCon and NewCon) you very rarely sell enough books to even make back the cost of the table in the dealer room, let alone covering costs overall.

It's a hard, hard life trying to run a small press these days. It's very difficult to actually make any money to invest back in the business, and you can struggle to just break even. I would very much doubt that anyone could actually make a living doing it, so you need another job/source of income ... and then that limits the amount of time you can spend promoting/travelling the country and so on. Unless you are retired with a pension which pays for everyday living ... then you might be able to make it work. Perhaps.
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: Peter Coleborn on August 16, 2010, 07:43:20 PM
This is a most instructive discussion. Someone should go through it, distill the salient points, and post a summary (I would if I had time). Personally, I prefer hardbacks. Given a choice, I rather have the signed editions. However, if there are haif-a-dozen such books coming out from writers you like (but not necessarily writers you avidly collect, when money is less of an obstacle), costs can be very high -- for the punter. Reasonably priced paperbacks should, in theory, sell -- after all, this is a close community and we all like to support each other, don't we. But like Telos, the Alchemy Press suffered from bad sales; and so many people seemed to be after review/complementary copies, even folk who knew the ins and outs of publishing. I am reluctant to invest more of my money in a loss-making enterprise.

I'm not sure how POD works. Does the press order, say, 100 copies of their new anthology and when they sell out order another 100? If so, what happens to first editions? Or do purchasers order a book via a POD company and then they print it as a one-off? (I really need to investigate this further.)

No one has mentioned online publications (have they?) -- whether PDFs or Kindle or whatever. Again, an area I'm trying to learn more about (I just prefer real books, see). Can these pay for themselves?


Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: Degsy on August 16, 2010, 07:49:10 PM
Wow. That's been a real insight for me into the mechanics of getting a book out there - and much respect for people like Allyson, Steve and David who battle-on against the odds on behalf of us readers.

I still feel that the e-book paradigm will change things. One of my worries as I mentioned before, is the impression I get sometimes (rightly or wrongly) that the principal market for British small press books is other small press authors and insiders (especially if selling at places like Fantasycon) and the result is a bit of a goldfish-bowl scenario with a natural ceiling beyond which the market can't be grown. This is, I think, where e-book sales will enable a different strand of people to be marketed to.
 
I gave Willie Meikle's 'Invasion' as an example - which seems to be selling quite well on Amazon Kindle with minimum publicity and this is probably due to the 'Web2.0' effect and things going 'viral'. One of the best discoveries I've made over the last few years or so is smashwords.com - a forum for e-book sales. On any given day there are thousands of e-books (including today such highbrow additions as 'Slug Orgy' and 'De Sade Assassins') and I recall that someone on this board had one of their books on for a token fee and got 2-3000 downloads in a couple of months, clearly reaching a much wider public than the usual 'con attendees. As I've said before, we are in a transitional period and if selling hardcopies is becoming less and less viable (if it ever was) maybe e-books offer an alternative.

I'm seeing more and more people now in the mornings at Cambridge train station with Kindles or e-readers (I'm still ruining my eyesight by using an I-pod touch) so it's definitely gonna happen - but whether it will ever be economically viable for a small press is anyone's guess.
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on August 16, 2010, 08:00:35 PM
I was wondering about something that Allyson mentioned - that Waterstone's were prepared to stock her book but asking for 57% off the asking price. This sounds a lot, but I suppose it depends on how many copies they were prepared to take and whether this was a firm order - in other words, there would be no returns on unsold books. The more books than can be printed in one batch the cheaper they become per copy, therefore if outlets like Waterstones were prepared to take serious numbers of copies, that would allow for a bigger print run, which would be cheaper per copy.

Of course, if they only wanted small numbers that wouldn't apply.

Perhaps every possible outlet should be looked at? There must be others besides Waterstones.

Wordsworth books are able to publish books at incredibly low prices. I appreciate that they only publish material that is out of copyright, but many small press writers would probably be interested in lower royalty percentages if they could have those kinds of numbers of books published, reaching a wider audience.

Wordsworth only have a small workforce, yet do manage to get their books out there onto the marketplace. That, I suppose, is the difference between the amateur small press and a small professional publisher.
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: Degsy on August 16, 2010, 08:04:58 PM
...and revisiting the frustration of my previous post that some authors choose to disenfranchise the vast majority of their fans by only publishing limited editions. Surely the book below must rank as the 'ne plus ultra' of this decadent trend and the authorial equivalent of 'let them eat cake'!

http://www.centipedepress.com/horror/dramasdepths.html
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on August 16, 2010, 08:09:23 PM
...and revisiting the frustration of my previous post that some authors choose to disenfranchise the vast majority of their fans by only publishing limited editions. Surely the book below must rank as the 'ne plus ultra' of this decadent trend and the authorial equivalent of 'let them eat cake'!

http://www.centipedepress.com/horror/dramasdepths.html


Oh dear, I actually bought that book.  ;D
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: Degsy on August 16, 2010, 08:31:33 PM

>>Oh dear, I actually bought that book.<<


To be fair, given the way these limited editions skyrocket in price once they're out of print, it's probably a very sound investment! :)

Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: allybird on August 16, 2010, 08:34:43 PM
Degsy. 'Wow. That's been a real insight for me into the mechanics of getting a book out there - and much respect for people like Allyson, Steve and David who battle-on against the odds on behalf of us readers.'

Authors have to battle for readers. I've taken some shit in the past for getting out there and trying to help my publisher...but if we don't...they can't do it alone.

Sadly, David...Waterstones/Amazon don't want to know, really... Ask Chris Teague and a few others of their experiences with the book stores and their small press books. They will know much more than I.

And as for trying your local newsapers and radio stations........I was in 4 newspapers and on one radio staion = nothing. Not one sale.

Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: brendanconnell on August 16, 2010, 09:23:37 PM
Peter: POD means that any number can be ordered, and they are literally printed as ordered. Sometimes even 1 at a time!

Most publishers involved in this however most likely print off 100 or 150 to start I'd imagine.

Oftentimes however the printers will send them directly to the buyer. This is the case with a place like Lightening Source for instance, if books are ordered through Amazon. At least this is my understanding - though I might not have it exactly right.
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: Rolnikov on August 17, 2010, 06:03:57 AM
On authors being published only in expensive editions, my feeling is that each author (and their talent) finds their own balance between prestige, profit and readers - obviously they are interconnected, and I'm simplifying hugely, but still...

Publishing a limited run at a high price is prestigious and probably quite profitable, but poor in numbers of readers. In the far corner, putting your book on Feedbooks or Amazon for free will be rich in readers, but poor in profit and prestige.

For me, my novels were all dashed off in under a month, mostly during NaNoWriMo - I've no expectation of ever making money from them. Writing is my hobby, not a job. Putting them all on Feedbooks (loaded up with adverts for the more serious stuff I publish - and the BFS, naturally) is fine for them.
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: Rolnikov on August 17, 2010, 06:22:05 AM
If you're selling through POD, you don't *have* to print any up front except half a dozen copies for the copyright libraries. You may want to have copies printed up for launch events, review copies and so on, but those things are, essentially, optional.

POD does make it possible to run a micro press without getting into a financial hole, if you carefully control your spending - and your authors' expectations. You can set a price that guarantees a small profit on every copy sold, and eventually it'll cover your costs, if you don't let them get out of control, and start to make a profit. The Mercury Annual (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/0956153305?ie=UTF8&tag=thebrifansoc-21&linkCode=as2&camp=1634&creative=19450&creativeASIN=0956153305) has already made a profit, for example, without being a best-seller.

On the other hand, if you're printing them all up in advance and sending them on to Amazon yourself, you have to take into account postage, packaging, Amazon's 60% discount and the amount of your time it's going to take up. It becomes a lot more difficult to make a profit then, I would think - like David Howe explains above. If you're not careful, it's easy to get into a Blue Monday situation where you're actually losing a little bit of money on each copy sold.

With ebooks I can't see any reason why a small press should be losing more than a token amount of money.

On promotion, self-publishing or publishing with a micro press is a choice - it doesn't give anyone a free pass on internet etiquette. There are too many authors on Goodreads, for example, who take the attitude that their lack of other options or ideas gives them the right to bother other users - posting off-topic about their books in every reading group they can find, for example - and they usually end up getting banned, or at least making a bad name for themselves.
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: allybird on August 17, 2010, 07:33:31 AM
I've no experience of Goodreads so don't know anything about it. Martin made me a banner which I used and it was attached to postings on some boards. This year Martin has been kind enough to make me one for Wine and Rank Poison but I'm only using it on Shocklines, on the odd occasion that I post there, now. Martin has one, too but they look complicated to set up to me...It is all a matter of experimentation and you have to be willing to make the effort even if it doesn't always work out...at least you tried. It actually worked out for me with my first collection, along with good reviews. People noticed the book, remembered it and bought it at Fantasycon...some liked it and the rest is history.

Actually if you are trying to work out what sells books and makes it a success. Reviews, reviews...reviews. Laird Barron wrote the first good review for me and others followed. Des Lewis writes wonderful real-time reviews and did one for me. Keep a page on your own web and show them. If someone says something extraordinary or exceptional put it in a prominent place on your web page. I've done that with Joe Lansdale's quotes.

Can't think of anything else just now that might help with getting a small press book off the ground. Word of mouth about a book being good, behind the scenes, works well of course.

 
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: Rolnikov on August 17, 2010, 08:05:42 AM
What happens on Goodreads is generally that someone will spam the groups, and when they are asked to stop, they say something like, "I have to, or no one will hear about my book."  ::)

Battling for readers is fine - bothering the readers not so much.
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: allybird on August 17, 2010, 08:34:37 AM
'Battling for readers is fine - bothering the readers not so much.'

Ah right. I've never seen it so don't know about it.
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on August 17, 2010, 08:56:47 AM
Allyson Bird said:

"Word of mouth about a book being good, behind the scenes, works well of course."

That's probably the best advertising you can get. So I've heard anyway.  :)
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: Shaun Jeffrey on August 17, 2010, 09:06:04 AM
Writing the book is easy compared with promoting it!
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: allybird on August 17, 2010, 01:03:14 PM
And what do I know....I've just heard from my publisher, Steve, that eight copies sold online recently. Perhaps I/we did something right somewhere but god knows where.

We've just done a stock check and out of 320 first and second editions we have 20 left so ...not bad. Steve will be able to put up sold out on it on the Screaming Dreams site, hopefully, this year.

David   "Word of mouth about a book being good, behind the scenes, works well of course."

'That's probably the best advertising you can get. So I've heard anyway.' 
 
And thank you to you David R for the support you gave to me when you read my collection, Bull Running for Girls saying it was 'beautifully written.' I really appreciated that. You were one of the first.

Peter made a good point...so perhaps there could be a small forum somewhere here for everyone to discuss publishing not just on separate threads? Just a thought. The Trials and Tribulations of Publishing for all...
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on September 04, 2010, 10:44:35 PM
I just heard from editor Robert Essig that my story They Pissed on my Sofa has been accepted for inclusion in the forthcoming anthology Malicious Deviance from Library of the Living Dead. This is an unusual tale for me as it's a non-supernatural horror story. If anything it's a crime horror story. About a man who had finally had enough when vandals not only wrecked his house but - as the title says!
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on September 05, 2010, 08:43:26 AM
The premise for the anthology Malicious Deviance was as follows:

"I am looking for well written speculative fiction with a heavy horror element focusing on bad protagonists from all walks of humanity. Everyone has the capacity for evil. Some people are born with it while others acquire evil through life's experiences or bad influence. Whatever the reason, I am seeking out stories of bad people doing bad things, meeting bad ends, or even reigning victorious in the end (though I will give preference to the bad guy getting it in the end. I'm not looking to completely glorify evil.) This does go against the lexicon of Good vs. Evil, but I don't give a shit. We're breaking the rules here. Bad people have stories that need to be told, and it's about time they're published in an anthology.


The stories must have a strong horror element, but feel free to cross your genres. I would like to see a good mix of styles and genres as long as horror is at the root of your story. Any time frame is welcome. You can use whatever POV you like, though 2nd and 1st person are a hard sell.
Be creative. Serial Killers, vampires, zombies, werewolves and other such well worn themes must be absolutely fantastic and mind blowing; even then they're a hard sell. I'm looking for all kinds of bad people, not just the ones we are used to reading as antagonists. Remember, anyone can be evil... Anyone.


And above all, be sure your protagonist is BAD, EVIL, DEVIANT, CRIMINAL -- choose your adjective, but if your protagonist isn't a bad person your story will be rejected outright."

Luckily, for some reason, most of my protagonists fit the bill!
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on September 20, 2010, 02:23:31 AM
One of the biggest surprises I got over the weekend at FantasyCon was Steve Jones coming over to me with a hardbound book called Zombi, (ЗОМБИ) which is a Russian version of The Mammoth Book of Zombies, which contains my novella Out of Corruption (Из Тлена).

This is a beautiful book, with gilt patterning on the cover and spine, and is without a doubt the most impressive version of that collection yet.

One of the best things about Steve is the fact that he does his very best to make sure that every author in his anthologies gets a copy of every version published anywhere in the world. For which, especially on this occasion, I am very grateful.

(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_tsO8Svtm0pM/TJZ-gJGJYSI/AAAAAAAAASU/ZD2T8zE6QEY/s1600/Russian+Zombie.jpg)
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on October 13, 2010, 06:39:48 AM
This is the proposed cover for the anthology Malicious Deviance, edited by Robert Essig for Library of the Living Dead in the States, which will include my story They Pissed On My Sofa.

(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_tsO8Svtm0pM/TLVEqkUjh9I/AAAAAAAAASs/vIZAgvw-jG8/s320/MaliciousDevianceCover+2.jpg)

Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on November 22, 2010, 10:40:30 AM
I'm pleased to reveal that next year there will be an Eighth Black Book of Horror, edited by Charles Black.

I'm even more pleased to reveal that I'll have a story in it, The Last Coach Trip.
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: Shaun Jeffrey on November 23, 2010, 08:15:53 AM
I'm pleased to reveal that next year there will be an Eighth Black Book of Horror, edited by Charles Black.

I'm even more pleased to reveal that I'll have a story in it, The Last Coach Trip.

Congratulations, David  :)
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on March 30, 2011, 09:17:35 AM
Robert Essig's anthology Malicious Deviance is now out. It contains a story of mine, They Pissed on my Sofa.

(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_tsO8Svtm0pM/TLVEqkUjh9I/AAAAAAAAASs/vIZAgvw-jG8/s320/MaliciousDevianceCover+2.jpg)

The book is available from Amazon:

http://www.amazon.com/Malicious-Deviance-Dr-Pus/dp/1456371207/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1301408724&sr=1-1 (http://www.amazon.com/Malicious-Deviance-Dr-Pus/dp/1456371207/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1301408724&sr=1-1)
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: CarolineC on March 30, 2011, 11:38:20 AM
It contains a story of mine, They Pissed on my Sofa.

With a title like that it sounds like a must-read, David!  :D
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on March 30, 2011, 12:19:13 PM
And to think, Caroline, at one time |I wouldn't have considered anything that didn't sound vaguely Lovecraftian (The Lurkers in the Abyss, The Shadow by the Altar, The Shade of Apollyon, etc.)   ::)
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: ajfrench on April 05, 2011, 07:12:32 AM
Great cover. Great story tittle, too.
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: Craig Herbertson on April 07, 2011, 10:06:30 AM
I'm pleased to reveal that next year there will be an Eighth Black Book of Horror, edited by Charles Black.

I'm even more pleased to reveal that I'll have a story in it, The Last Coach Trip.

Congratulations, David  :)

Good one David. looking forward to it.
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on April 09, 2011, 12:22:30 AM
The following press statement has been issued by the Horror Writers Association:



The Bram Stoker Award Juries are now complete, and the Horror Writers Association therefore proudly announces our very impressive panels.

Please remember, there are strict Rules against spamming the Juries. All offers of your work, or the work of others may be sent ONLY to the Chair of the appropriate Jury. Do not contact Jurors directly or you will be at risk of having the work you are promoting disqualified from Stoker consideration.

The email address of each Chair is listed below:

Novel - Bruce Boston (Chair). Email: stokernovel@horror.org

Jurors: J L Comeau, Sandy DeLuca, Wayne Edwards, David Riley

First Novel - Joe Nassise. Email: stokerfirstnovel@horror.org

Jurors: Jonathan Maberry, David Niall Wilson, Jeanne Stein, Janice Gable Bashman

Collection - Joe McKinney. Email: stokercollection@horror.org

Jurors: Ellen Datlow, Mark Onspaugh, Judy Comeau, John Everson

Anthology - Norman Rubenstein. Email: stokerantho@horror.org

Jurors: Allyson Bird, Christopher Conlon, Gene O’Neill, Harry Shannon

Graphic Novels - Steve Tem. Email: stokergraphicnovel@horror.org

Jurors: Norman Prentiss, David T Wilbanks, Ken Lillie-Paetz, Dave Sakmyster

Young Adult - Lynne Hansen. Email: stokeryanovel@horror.org

Jurors: Joel Sutherland, Dotti Enderle, Deb LeBlanc, Jeanne Stein

Long Fiction - Martel Sardina. Email: stokerlongfic@horror.org

Jurors: Chris Welch, Nate Kenyon, Richard Payne, Janet Berliner

Short Fiction - Sarah Langan. Email: stokershortfic@horror.org

Jurors: Scott Edelman, Mark Worthen, Cathy Clamp, F Brett Cox

Screenplays - JG Faherty. Email: stokerscreenplay@horror.org

Jurors: David Sakmyster, T J May, Norman Rubinstein, John Palisano

Nonfiction - Robert Booth. Email: stokernonfic@horror.org

Jurors: Nancy Holder, Linda Addison, Jill Bauman, Weston Ochse

Poetry - Karen Newman. Email: stokerpoetry@horror.org

Jurors: Sandy DeLuca, Terrie Leigh Relf, Lucy Snyder, Michael Burstein

Any queries should be directed to Stoker Co-Chair Hank Schwaeble via email: hschwaeble@yahoo.com.

Rocky Wood

President, HWA
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: Rolnikov on April 09, 2011, 10:30:21 AM
Pleased to see you and Allyson representing the BFS on there - hope you both enjoy the experience.

It'll be interesting to see how the jury system works out for the HWA, how long they stick with it. I know the BFS tried it a long time ago but I don't think it lasted long. I wouldn't be keen on us taking that route.
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on April 09, 2011, 10:40:24 AM
The final ballot, I must emphasise, to decide on the Stoker winners will still be solely one of Active HWA members. The Juries are only there to add works to the preliminary ballot that have, in their opinion, outstanding merit but were somehow overlooked and did not receive enough members' votes to get there.

Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: Rolnikov on April 09, 2011, 11:10:34 AM
Ah, I see. I guess we wouldn't need something like that for the BFAs, because it only takes a single recommendation to get onto our longlist.
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: Des Lewis on April 09, 2011, 12:00:23 PM
The final ballot, I must emphasise, to decide on the Stoker winners will still be solely one of Active HWA members. The Juries are only there to add works to the preliminary ballot that have, in their opinion, outstanding merit but were somehow overlooked and did not receive enough members' votes to get there.


In my day on the Oversight Jury (13 years ago?), there was only one such jury for all award categories. It now looks as if they have a different Oversight Jury for each category?

Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: allybird on April 09, 2011, 12:10:06 PM
Thanks Stephen!

Here is the section on the voting...

'At the end of each awards year, jurors in each category will select their top five works, which will then move onto the preliminary ballot; the remaining five works in each category will be those receiving the most Recommendations from the members (where a work appears on both the Jury and Recommendation it will thereafter only appear on the Jury list – see section VIIg of the Rules). In the preliminary ballot the Top Five Recommend Works and the Five Juried selections in each category will be voted on by Active Members to determine three Recommended Works and Three Juried works for a total of six works to appear on the Final Stoker ballot in that category. The Final ballot will be voted on by HWA's Active members to determine category winner(s).'



Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: Rolnikov on April 09, 2011, 12:17:23 PM
So they're effectively running two parallel systems at the same time..? Sounds like they don't trust their own voters to put the best books on the final ballot...
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on April 09, 2011, 12:39:10 PM
So they're effectively running two parallel systems at the same time..? Sounds like they don't trust their own voters to put the best books on the final ballot...

Not really. But it's easy for works to be overlooked - that particularly happens with overseas books in my view. It would be good if British writers, who often miss out on being noticed by the bulk of HWA members, who are mostly American, contacted the organisation about any new novels they would like considering. Just take a look at the rules first.
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on April 20, 2011, 07:54:28 AM
It was my turn yesterday to be subject of The Inquisition on Colin Leslie's The Black Abyss.

http://blackabyss.co.uk/2011/04/david-a-riley-the-inquisition/

Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on July 26, 2011, 09:01:17 AM
My first collection of short stories, most of which were previously professionally published in magazines and anthologies here and in the United States, was set to be brought out by Midnight House. This project is now quite a few years old and, unable to contact John Pelan, the owner of Midnight House, and with its website down for the best part of a year now, I have reluctantly come to the conclusion that the book is not going to be brought out.

I had already turned down one alternative offer to publish this collection several years ago by Ex-Occidente. Since then, due to the delays from Midnight House, Johnny Mains, owner of Noose and Gibbet Press, has repeatedly urged me to let him publish it instead. Last night, recognising that my original arrangement with Midnight House appears to have died, I agreed. My collection will now be published by Noose and Gibbet in the Spring/Summer of next year in hardback.

I am now going back to look over the stories which were originally to be in this collection and I will probably make a few alterations to the line up, probably substituting some newer ones.

I would like to thank Johnny for his kind offer and I look forward to working with him on this project, which I am confident at last will really happen.
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: John L Probert on July 26, 2011, 03:32:22 PM
Hi David

I know I'm not the only one who's been looking forward to seeing your collection. This is seriously good news and hopefully we'll be able to add a signed copy to the Probert Towers library?

JLP
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: CarolineC on July 26, 2011, 08:58:09 PM
I, too, am looking forward to this collection, David. Sorry the previous deals fell through, but good to hear Johnny is going to publish it. I'll be after a signed copy too!  ;D

By the way, sorry to go off topic on your thread, but I've tried emailing you (both email addresses, including the BFS one) and PM-ing you via this forum about putting some event news in the next Prism - waited ages, but no response from you. How can I get in touch with you about it? Thanks.
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: DavidJHowe on July 27, 2011, 08:17:38 AM
I, too, am looking forward to this collection, David. Sorry the previous deals fell through, but good to hear Johnny is going to publish it. I'll be after a signed copy too!  ;D

By the way, sorry to go off topic on your thread, but I've tried emailing you (both email addresses, including the BFS one) and PM-ing you via this forum about putting some event news in the next Prism - waited ages, but no response from you. How can I get in touch with you about it? Thanks.
Hi Caroline -- if it's news you have, then email it to news@britishfantasysociety.org and it will be picked up for the website and possibly the email newsletter ...

PRISM is tending not to be the place for news at the moment, however, due to the longer lead times, and the fact that online is a far better and more timely way to disseminate it.

David
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: CarolineC on July 27, 2011, 12:37:22 PM
OK David, will do. The event isn't until October, which is why I was wanting some info from David R on when/whether to send him something for Prism. I'd intended to send it for the website nearer the time, so I'll just wait till it's more "confirmed" and then go for the website. I'd still like to contact David about the possibility though. If you read this, David, please get in touch!  :)
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: benedictjjones on July 29, 2011, 11:02:06 AM
brilliant news on the collection , david. really looking forward to it.
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on August 02, 2011, 01:31:55 PM
brilliant news on the collection , david. really looking forward to it.

Thanks, Benedict. It's taken a lot longer to get published than I originally expected, with two publishers now having gone under since the project was first started! You'd think it was cursed.  ???
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: Craig Herbertson on August 24, 2011, 10:01:45 PM
Good one David. Publishing industry is not the most reliable as we all know but I'm sure Noose and Gibbet will turnout a goodie ;D
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on September 24, 2011, 06:25:29 PM
One of my first ever professional sales (After Nightfall in The Years Best Horror 1 back in 1970) has just been reprinted in a mass market paperback in the States, Zombies! Zombies! Zombies! edited by Otto Penzler for Vintage/Random House. http://www.amazon.com/Zombies-Vintage-Crime-Lizard-Original/dp/0307740897/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1316884691&sr=1-1 (http://www.amazon.com/Zombies-Vintage-Crime-Lizard-Original/dp/0307740897/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1316884691&sr=1-1)

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61kyCzo5FKL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on October 13, 2011, 03:21:21 PM
Dark Continents Press will be publishing my Lovecraftian horror novel, The Return as a trade paperback and e-book. Set in the North of England, I believe it's probably the darkest, bleakest piece of fiction I have written so far.
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: Colin (Black Abyss) on October 14, 2011, 07:25:30 PM
Dark and bleak, sounds great, congratulations David ;D
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: Shaun Jeffrey on October 23, 2011, 10:26:41 AM
Congratulations, David  :)
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: benedictjjones on November 15, 2011, 12:46:23 PM
great news, when is the release date for 'the return'? (if there is one yet)
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on November 15, 2011, 03:24:55 PM
Thanks, Benedict.

I've been told August next year, which coincides nicely with my short story collection from Noose & Gibbet, which is due out in September.
Title: Re: Downloadable copy: His Pale Blue Eyes
Post by: David A. Riley on December 18, 2011, 12:09:30 PM
(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-nBYCQxSxmlk/Tg1n3dF4dfI/AAAAAAAAJJE/Pq0WbdwpM_I/s320/Bite+Sized+Horror.jpg)

It was nice to see a glowing review of Obverse Books' Bite Sized Horror on the BFS website, though unfortunately the book is now out of print. http://www.britishfantasysociety.co.uk/reviews/bite-sized-horror-review/ (http://www.britishfantasysociety.co.uk/reviews/bite-sized-horror-review/)

However, if anyone would like to read a copy of my story in it, His Pale Blue Eyes, a downloadable pdf copy, complete with illustration, is available courtesy of The Vault of Evil's Advent Calendar:

Edited to add that I was wrong, this book is not out of print and is still available from Obverse Books. As it's now past Christmas - and as Bite Sized Horror is still available - I am removing the link to download my story. 
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: Craig Herbertson on December 29, 2011, 10:27:33 PM
It's a great story david. Had the emotinal impact of Harlan Ellison's boy and a dog
Title: Re: Downloadable copy: His Pale Blue Eyes
Post by: Jay Eales on January 03, 2012, 10:34:27 AM
(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-nBYCQxSxmlk/Tg1n3dF4dfI/AAAAAAAAJJE/Pq0WbdwpM_I/s320/Bite+Sized+Horror.jpg)

It was nice to see a glowing review of Obverse Books' Bite Sized Horror on the BFS website, though unfortunately the book is now out of print. http://www.britishfantasysociety.co.uk/reviews/bite-sized-horror-review/ (http://www.britishfantasysociety.co.uk/reviews/bite-sized-horror-review/)

Actually, I've just been speaking with the publisher, and Bite-Sized Horror is still very much in print. Not sure where you got the impression it was all sold out, David.

http://obversebooks.co.uk/shop/obverse-quarterly/ (http://obversebooks.co.uk/shop/obverse-quarterly/)

Best,

Jay
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on January 03, 2012, 10:40:33 AM
Because it did disappear from Obverse's list of available books and because Obverse did attempt to make it available as an e-book (they failed because they failed to get permission to do this in their original contracts with the writers and were unwilling to make any additional payments for it). That it seems to have reappeared again may be because it's now available POD. If so, that's good news. I wouldn't mind buying an extra copy myself.  :)
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: Stuart Douglas on January 03, 2012, 03:44:37 PM
Hi

Just popping in to correct a few apparent misapprehensions.  

The book was never removed even for a minute from sale on the website (and we don't have a 'list of available books', except the usual PubWeb listing, from which it was never removed) - to date it's sold about three copies in spite of uniformly excellent reviews, so we still have lots of copies left from the original print run.  I've no idea what makes you think it had been removed, David.  And Obverse have never done POD, so I've no idea where you got that erroneous idea either...

As for the eBook - well, let's just say that's a surprisingly unpleasant and disingenuous way of describing the actual situation.  Ebooks are an entirely new thing for Obverse but which a lot of people had asked for - it hadn't even crossed my mind that a separate contract was needed (and as it turns out Johnny seems not to have got any contracts signed for even the paper versions!).  However, I pulled the ebook version from the site within an hour of it going live, literally within seconds of Johnny coming back to tell me that a couple of authors were unhappy (and given the loss the book made, it wasn't really possible to pay anything further for ebooks, I'm afraid).  On a positive note, I've now included ebooks in all our future projects to avoid a repeat of this misunderstanding.

Anyway, as I say, the book remains in print and in stock, should anyone wish to pop along and buy a copy - and David's story is, as with the others in the book, really bloody good and worth a read either in BSH or in the downloadable advent calendar version!

All the best for 2012,

Stuart
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on January 03, 2012, 03:59:03 PM
Thanks for the correction, Stuart. I honestly did think it had been removed from your listings at some point as I looked at them to order a copy for someone and was unable to find it. My mistake obviously. The POD suggestion was because that was the only alternative I could think of if the original print run had sold. I believe, though again I could be wrong, only 100 were printed. It seems a shame that such a small print run has not sold out by now. It really should have done better than it obviously has with the great reviews it received.

As for the e-book version, unpleasantly worded or not, that was how the issue appeared to me at the time. Personally, as you can see from the free download I have made available, I was not bothered about any additional payments for my own story, but I believe others were, though it's quite understandable, given the number of copies still left on your hands, why you were unwilling to pay out more. It was a good payment, in any case, given the original print run!

I have now removed the link to my story. It's well past Christmas, in any case. And I wouldn't want to do anything to diminish chances of more copies of Bite Sized Horror being sold. So go on and order one if you already haven't: it's got Reggie Oliver, Conrad Williams, Paul Kane, Marie O'Regan and Johnny Mains in it, for God's sake!

http://www.britishfantasysociety.co.uk/reviews/bite-sized-horror-review/ (http://www.britishfantasysociety.co.uk/reviews/bite-sized-horror-review/)



Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: Stuart Douglas on January 03, 2012, 04:23:23 PM
Thanks for the correction, Stuart. I honestly did think it had been removed from your listings at some point as I looked at them to order a copy for someone and was unable to find it. My mistake obviously. The POD suggestion was because that was the only alternative I could think of if the original print run had sold. I believe, though again I could be wrong, only 100 were printed. It seems a shame that such a small print run has not sold out by now. It really should have done better than it obviously has with the great reviews it received.

As for the e-book version, unpleasantly worded or not, that was how the issue appeared to me at the time. Personally, as you can see from the free download I have made available, I was not bothered about any additional payments for my own story, but I believe others were, though it's quite understandable, given the number of copies still left on your hands, why you were unwilling to pay out more. It was a good payment, in any case, given the original print run!

Ah well, we all live and learn, in all sorts of ways :-)

There were only 100 in the original print run, but I suspect horror is a field in which there is so much product that one small collection can easily be lost - and one positive way to look on the paucity of sales is that it's always nice to have books still in stock! :)

Stuart
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: Stuart Douglas on January 03, 2012, 04:33:06 PM
I have now removed the link to my story. It's well past Christmas, in any case. And I wouldn't want to do anything to diminish chances of more copies of Bite Sized Horror being sold. So go on and order one if you already haven't: it's got Reggie Oliver, Conrad Williams, Paul Kane, Marie O'Regan and Johnny Mains in it, for God's sake!

http://www.britishfantasysociety.co.uk/reviews/bite-sized-horror-review/ (http://www.britishfantasysociety.co.uk/reviews/bite-sized-horror-review/)

LOL - thanks for that, David. 

And I believe Johnny is hoping to do a BSH 2 (though not with Obverse - a more horror oriented published might have more luck!), and the more sales he can claim for this original version, the more likely that'll be :)

Stuart
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on January 05, 2012, 02:16:47 PM
Zombies: A Compendium of the Living Dead edited by Otto Penzler

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51hdRUlHihL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)

Zombies! Zombies! Zombies! which was published in the States last year by Vintage has been reprinted in the UK by Corvus/Atlantic Books, with a new cover and a new title, Zombies: A Compendium of the Living Dead. Included in its 832 pages (the second story in) is my own After Nightfall.

I only discovered this when Pete Coleborn put an item in about the book on Facebook. He had reviewed it on his blog http://piperatthegatesoffantasy.blogspot.com/2012/01/zombies-edited-by-otto-penzler.html (http://piperatthegatesoffantasy.blogspot.com/2012/01/zombies-edited-by-otto-penzler.html).

It's great to see this 1970 story getting yet another airing! A nice surprise for the New Year.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Zombies-Compendium-Otto-Penzler/dp/0857890271/ref=sr_1_47?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1325771132&sr=1-47 (http://www.amazon.co.uk/Zombies-Compendium-Otto-Penzler/dp/0857890271/ref=sr_1_47?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1325771132&sr=1-47)
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: Peter Coleborn on January 05, 2012, 05:51:36 PM
Zombies: A Compendium of the Living Dead edited by Otto Penzler


I only discovered this when Pete Coleborn put an item in about the book on Facebook. He had reviewed it on his blog http://piperatthegatesoffantasy.blogspot.com/2012/01/zombies-edited-by-otto-penzler.html (http://piperatthegatesoffantasy.blogspot.com/2012/01/zombies-edited-by-otto-penzler.html).


It's not a proper review -- just a description of the book  ;)
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: Peter Coleborn on January 05, 2012, 05:52:06 PM
And congrats on the story reprint!
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on January 06, 2012, 09:02:20 AM
And congrats on the story reprint!

Thanks, Peter. And for your help in finding out about it!
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on March 11, 2012, 02:56:10 PM
Received an email from the States last night from the editor of a zombie anthology to be published in August and they would like to reprint my story from the Seventh Black Book of Horror, Romero's Children. With Otto Penzler's Zombie: A Compendium, John Pelan's Century's Best Horror Fiction and Dave Sutton's The Satyr's Head: Tales of Terror, this will be my fourth paying reprint recently.
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on March 13, 2012, 01:32:14 PM
I noticed that I'd been having quite a few hits on my blog recently from Russia and, in particular, the Ukraine. Checking into this, one of the most common links was to a Russian website http://www.fantlab.ru/forum/forum15page1/topic4443page29 (http://www.fantlab.ru/forum/forum15page1/topic4443page29). Surprisingly, doing a bit of a search on it, I discovered that one of my earliest stories, After Nightfall, was published in a hardback anthology there in 1992. The stories in Tayaschiysya Horror 2 (Таящийся ужас 2) appear to have all been translated by Vladimir Vladimirova. If the details are correct the book had quite a large circulation - 100,000 copies!

http://www.fantlab.ru/edition15932 (http://www.fantlab.ru/edition15932)

It's strange what a bit of knocking about the internet can turn up.

Other writers in the book include David Case, Rosemary Timperley, Ramsey Campbell, Hazel Heald, William F. Nolan, Bram Stoker, Eddie C. Bertin, Patricia Highsmith and others.

This is its cover:

(http://www.fantlab.ru/images/editions/big/15932)

Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on March 22, 2012, 02:59:12 PM
Just came across an interview with Otto Penzler about his massive anthology Zombies! Zombies! Zombies! (Zombies: a Compendium in the UK). The last question he is asked is: "If a reader has an opportunity to read only one story from Zombies! Zombies! Zombies!, which one would you recommend?" He would recommend two: "...the stories that jump to mind are Seabrook's "Dead Men Working in the Cane Fields" because it's such a comprehensive introduction in the genre, and David A. Riley's "After Nightfall" because it is, holy moley, so damned scary."

What can I say?

http://suvudu.com/2011/09/interview-with-otto-penzler-editor-zombies-zombies-zombies.html (http://suvudu.com/2011/09/interview-with-otto-penzler-editor-zombies-zombies-zombies.html)
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on April 03, 2012, 08:48:01 AM
I've had my fantasy novel Goblin Mire available as an ebook through Renaissance eBooks for about four and a half years, but it has not done very well. Part of this, I am sure, is because of the awful amateurish cover which my publisher slapped on it.

On his own initiative Joe Young produced an alternative cover, which I believe is considerably better and which I am really pleased with. As a result, I have emailed Renaissance eBooks to cancel my contract with them, so I can go through the novel and revise it thoroughly before making it available again, probably through Amazon, as an ebook and a POD paperback, using Joe's cover.

Hopefully this time it will have more success.

This is Joe's cover:

(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-tzZTmLiVC9U/T3nxnOpQFTI/AAAAAAAAAXk/0KDHkVDKaKQ/s400/Goblin+Mire.bmp)
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: mightyjoeyoung on April 04, 2012, 10:56:35 AM
Thank you David, it was a pleasure to do it for you. I hope the book is more successful in the next four and a half years.
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on April 18, 2012, 02:37:08 PM
After several years of dissatisfaction with how they have handled my fantasy novel, Goblin Mire, I finally emailed Renaissance eBooks, asking them to cancel my contract with them. So far they haven't bothered to reply. On checking today to see if the ebook is still available I find, to my surprise, that it isn't, either at Amazon or Barnes & Noble. It's what I wanted, but wouldn't it have been a little more professional if Renaissance eBooks had taken the time to let me know?

Anyway, I can now set about doing a rewrite of the novel (which could do with some cutting down in size - mainly in the use of adjectives!!!), then I'll put it back on as an eBook and POD through Amazon with a brand new cover courtesy of Joe Young.

New cover:
(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-tzZTmLiVC9U/T3nxnOpQFTI/AAAAAAAAAXk/0KDHkVDKaKQ/s320/Goblin+Mire.bmp)

Old cover:  
(http://img2.imagesbn.com/images/61470000/61478332.JPG)

Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on July 10, 2012, 08:51:18 PM
Surprised on Facebook to find an animated film showing the creation of the illustration for my story Fish Eye  in the next issue of the Lovecraft eZine, which is a special Deep Ones edition.

http://youtu.be/SYsOCvAF-QU (http://youtu.be/SYsOCvAF-QU)
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on July 20, 2012, 08:30:42 PM
Dave Sutton will shortly be reprinting one of my earliest short stories, The Farmhouse, in Horror! Under the Tombstone.

I only today discovered that this story has previously been published twice in Italy in translation in separate anthologies from the same publisher as La fattoria.

(http://www.fantascienza.com/catalogo/imgbank/cover/05192.jpg)
(http://www.fantascienza.com/catalogo/imgbank/cover/PC109.jpg)

http://www.fantascienza.com/catalogo/volumi/NILF105192/horror-story-2/ (http://www.fantascienza.com/catalogo/volumi/NILF105192/horror-story-2/)

http://www.fantascienza.com/catalogo/volumi/NILF122706/i-grandi-autori-moderni/ (http://www.fantascienza.com/catalogo/volumi/NILF122706/i-grandi-autori-moderni/)

Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on July 26, 2012, 09:25:07 AM
The latest issue of The Lovecraft eZine isn't online yet, though it should be later today. This, though, is its cover:

(http://a6.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash3/599623_497691726924045_1832056132_n.jpg)
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on July 26, 2012, 03:59:13 PM
The latest issue of The Lovecraft eZine is now available online.

Lovecraft eZine issue16 (http://lovecraftzine.com/issues/issue-16-july-2012/)

Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on August 20, 2012, 06:55:27 AM
Received my copy of Extreme Zombies, edited by Paula Guran for Prime Books in the United States, which includes a reprint of my story Romero's Children, originally published in The Seventh Black Book of Horror.

(http://media-cache1.pinterest.com/upload/162129655305478433_4NEhyd05_c.jpg)

Prime Books (http://www.prime-books.com/)
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on September 10, 2012, 08:57:46 PM
Charles Black has just released details of the cover for The Ninth Black Book of Horror, which should be launched at FantasyCon later this month.

(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-8SPwvb8jZW8/UE4nTiO8hZI/AAAAAAAAAYk/VUWBv1UTqg8/s640/BB9preview.jpg)

 Contents are:

The Anatomy Lesson - John Llewellyn Probert
The Mall - Craig Herbertson
Salvaje - Simon Bestwick
Pet - Gary Fry
Ashes to Ashes - David Williamson
The Apprentice - Anna Taborska
Life Expectancy - Sam Dawson
What's Behind You? - Paul Finch
Ben's Best Friend - Gary Power
The Things That Aren't There - Thana Niveau
Bit on the Side - Tom Johnstone
Indecent Behaviour - Marion Pitman
His Family - Kate Farrell
A Song, A Silence - John Forth
The Man Who Hated Waste - Marc Lyth
Swan Song - David A. Riley
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on October 02, 2012, 09:31:23 AM
Just received confirmation this morning that a collection of my stories will be published online by an American publisher. Title of the collection is yet to be confirmed, but the stories included are a novelette, The Worst of All Possible Places, originally published in Houses on the Borderland by the BFS, Lock In and Their Own Mad Demons, which were originally published in the Black Books of Horror, The Fragile Mask on his Face, which appeared in Dark Discoveries, and The True Spirit, which was published in the award winning anthology Back from the Dead.

More information later.
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on October 11, 2012, 08:52:25 PM
My collection His Own Mad Demons will be published by Hazardous Press as a print and a Kindle ebook on the 26th October.

(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-omxoXV9sx88/UHccyhc1XDI/AAAAAAAAAZU/byrXqRovYNU/s320/HisOwnMadDemons22.jpg)

The collection will include one novelette and four long stories:

The Worst of all Possible Places (Houses on the Borderland, BFS, edited by David A. Sutton)
Lock In (The Black Book of Horror, edited by Charles Black)
Their Own Mad Demons (The Fifth Black Book of Horror, edited by Charles Black)
The Fragile Mask on his Face (Dark Discoveries #15, edited by James Beach)
The True Spirit (Back from the Dead, edited by Johnny Mains)


If anyone would like a review copy please contact me on rileybooks(at)ntlworld.com.

Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on October 25, 2012, 03:03:22 PM
(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-omxoXV9sx88/UHccyhc1XDI/AAAAAAAAAZU/byrXqRovYNU/s400/HisOwnMadDemons22.jpg)

Copies of my collection of four long stories and a novelette, His Own Mad Demons, are now available as kindle ebooks via Amazon.com and Amazon.co.uk.

http://www.amazon.com/His-Own-Mad-Demons-ebook/dp/B009WG3L5E/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1351173271&sr=8-1&keywords=his+own+mad+demons

http://www.amazon.co.uk/His-Own-Mad-Demons-ebook/dp/B009WG3L5E/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1351173214&sr=8-1

Print versions should be available shortly.

Product Description
David A. Riley’s first professionally published story was in the 11th Pan Book of Horror in 1970. Since then, he has been published in numerous anthologies from ROC Books, DAW Books, Robinson Books, Corgi Books, Doubleday, Playboy Paperbacks, and Sphere. Two recent notable anthologies in which he has appeared are The Century’s Best Horror Fiction, from Cemetery Dance, and Otto Penzler’s Zombies! Zombies! Zombies!, from Vintage Books.

In 1995, David and his wife Linden edited and published Beyond, a fantasy/SF magazine. His stories have been published in magazines such as Aboriginal Science Fiction, Dark Discoveries, Fear, Fantasy Tales, Whispers and World of Horror.

His Own Mad Demons contains his stories "Lock-In", "The Worst of All Possible Places", "The Fragile Mask on His Face", "Their Own Mad Demons", and "The True Spirit".
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on October 28, 2012, 08:52:20 PM
Paperback copies of my collection from Hazardous Press, His Own Mad Demons, are now available via Amazon.com and Amazon.co.uk.  In the US it's $9.99 and £6.23 in the UK (with free shipping available).

http://www.amazon.com/His-Own-Mad-Demons-Tales/dp/0615718728/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1351456237&sr=1-1&keywords=His+own+mad+demons

http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/0615718728/ref=oh_details_o00_s00_i00

(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-omxoXV9sx88/UHccyhc1XDI/AAAAAAAAAZU/byrXqRovYNU/s400/HisOwnMadDemons22.jpg)

Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on November 14, 2012, 04:40:41 PM
Cruentus Libri will be including a reprint of one of my stories in From Their Cradle to Your Grave, due out at the end of this month. Prickly was originally published in Death (Playboy Paperbacks, edited by Stuart Schiff).

(http://sphotos-e.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash3/540142_515937515101658_597367328_n.jpg)

http://cruentuslibri.wordpress.com/ (http://cruentuslibri.wordpress.com/)
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on November 16, 2012, 08:49:19 AM
(http://sphotos-b.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash3/63700_516255835069826_1731419185_n.jpg)

Published by Cruentus Libri, and edited by Kevin G. Bufton, Under the Knife will include a reprint of my story Winter on Aubarch 6, which originally appeared in Fear magazine some years ago.The cover is by the ever brilliant Steve Upham.
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on November 24, 2012, 02:05:07 PM
Very pleased to announce that Tales to Terrify, which produces a truly fascinating series of podcasts, has just accepted my zombie story, His Pale Blue Eyes, for a future broadcast. The story was first published in Bite-Sized Horror, Obverse Books, 2011.
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on December 01, 2012, 10:51:47 AM
(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-omxoXV9sx88/UHccyhc1XDI/AAAAAAAAAZU/byrXqRovYNU/s400/HisOwnMadDemons22.jpg)

For today, Saturday only, my collection, His Own Mad Demons, can be downloaded free on kindle from Amazon.co.uk and Amazon.com.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/His-Own-Mad-Demons-ebook/dp/B009WG3L5E/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1351173214&sr=8-1

http://www.amazon.com/His-Own-Mad-Demons-ebook/dp/B009WG3L5E/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1351173271&sr=8-1&keywords=his+own+mad+demons

The print version has been reduced to £5.61 on Amazon.co.uk, with free shipping available.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/0615718728/ref=oh_details_o00_s00_i00

Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on January 06, 2013, 03:51:30 PM
Great write up on The Vault of Evil of my short story collection His Own Mad Demons.

(http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y218/haloofflies/davidarileyhisownmaddemons_zpsd47ca33f.jpg)

http://vaultofevil.proboards.com/index.cgi?action=display&board=itsthenewthing&thread=5083&page=1 (http://vaultofevil.proboards.com/index.cgi?action=display&board=itsthenewthing&thread=5083&page=1)
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on May 20, 2013, 01:40:11 PM
Cruentus Libri Press have reprinted a science fiction horror story of mine, Winter on Aubarch 6, in their anthology Under the Knife edited by Kevin G. Bufton.

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51B9tsce3wL._SY445_.jpg)

http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/1482009552

This originally appeared in 1989 in Fear magazine:

(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_tsO8Svtm0pM/S8_soJ_6V3I/AAAAAAAAAFY/5gt2cD-gXi0/s320/fear%5B1%5D.jpg)

Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on June 17, 2013, 11:30:11 AM
Brilliant review of my collection His Own Mad Demons from The Ginger Nuts of Horror.

http://www.gingernutsofhorror.com/4/post/2013/06/his-own-mad-demons-by-david-a-riley.html

Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on June 22, 2013, 12:11:32 AM
Another encouraging review of His Own Mad Demons, this time on Hellnotes.

http://hellnotes.com/his-own-mad-demons-dark-tales-from-david-a-riley-book-review

"For many, His Own Mad Demons, may be a bit different than the horror you are used to reading.  David A. Riley has a writing style very similar to early Peter Straub and very British to boot.  That said, the five novelettes in this collection are wonderfully eerie, spooky and unsettling.  Which to me, makes for a great read.

That’s not to say there isn’t quite a bit of extreme guts and gore in these stories – there is – more than enough to make my nose crinkle up and my stomach turn more than once.  It’s all just well balanced, and that is hard to find in shorter works like these novelettes."

Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: Des Lewis on June 22, 2013, 07:59:09 AM
Congratulations, David, on all your success.
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on June 22, 2013, 10:00:57 AM
Congratulations, David, on all your success.

Thanks, Des!
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on July 03, 2013, 10:33:31 AM
(http://gingernutsofhorror.com/uploads/3/2/2/1/3221101/header_images/1371577866.jpg)

Just had a five-minute interview posted on the Ginger Nuts of Horror site.

http://www.gingernutsofhorror.com/5/post/2013/07/five-minutes-with-david-a-riley.html
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on July 04, 2013, 09:34:45 AM
(http://darkvisions.greymatterpress.com/lib/images/demo/page5.jpg)

My long story Scrap will be included in Dark Visions 1 from Grey Matter Press this summer.

Contributing Authors:

The Troll - Jonathan Balog
Collage - Jay Caselberg
Delicate Spaces - Brian Fatah Steele
What Do You Need? - Milo James Fowler
Second Opinion - Ray Garton
The Weight of Paradise - Jeff Hemenway
Three Minutes - Sarah L. Johnson
Raining Stones - Sean Logan
Mister Pockets: A Pine Deep Story - Jonathan Maberry
Thanatos Park - Charles Austin Muir
The Last Ice Cream Kiss - Jason S. Ridler
Scrap - David A. Riley
Show Me - John F.D. Taff

http://darkvisions.greymatterpress.com/slideshow/index.html


Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on July 30, 2013, 01:04:32 PM
The final cover for my short story collection from Shadow Publishing is now ready:

(http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-Euq_rSUT_mk/UfqbDNXmrKI/AAAAAAAAAcU/FIiyR-cJAeM/s1600/Lurkers+in+the+abyss+cover.png)

http://www.shadowpublishing.webeasysite.co.uk/shadow7_011.htm
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on September 15, 2013, 10:29:52 AM
(http://bloodboundbooks.net/bloodboundbooks/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/1004683_790354477658397_994618587_n-200x300.jpg)

When Gary Morgan travels north to lie low after a gangland shooting in London, a childhood friend is violently maimed within hours of his arrival. Decades after escaping the blight of his hometown, he finds himself ensnared in the place he hates more than any other.

Feuding families, bloodthirsty syndicates, and hostile forces older than mankind all play a role in the escalating chaos surrounding Gary Morgan. Now he must unravel the mysteries of Grudge End and his own past or meet his doom in the grip of an ancient, unimaginable evil.

COMING SEPTEMBER 30

http://bloodboundbooks.net/bloodboundbooks/?page_id=769
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on September 16, 2013, 10:58:37 PM
It looks like copies of The Lurkers in the Abyss are now available from Amazon: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Lurkers-Abyss-Other-Tales-Terror/dp/095390329X/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1379365179&sr=1-1&keywords=the+lurkers+in+the+abyss (http://www.amazon.co.uk/Lurkers-Abyss-Other-Tales-Terror/dp/095390329X/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1379365179&sr=1-1&keywords=the+lurkers+in+the+abyss):


(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51Pwf0pn8gL._SY445_.jpg)

Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: benedictjjones on September 18, 2013, 03:05:21 PM
David, is 'the return' going to be print or ebook? sounds right up my street
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on September 18, 2013, 04:12:32 PM
David, is 'the return' going to be print or ebook? sounds right up my street

It will be both.

Hope you do like it.
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: benedictjjones on September 18, 2013, 04:50:14 PM
will be grabbing the print one then  :)
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on September 26, 2013, 02:22:49 PM
For those who prefer electronic versions of books, my novel The Return is now available on kindle for only £1.99 or $3.19 on Amazon.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/The-Return-ebook/dp/B00FEZ8WQA/ref=sr_1_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1380200420&sr=1-1&keywords=the+return+david+riley

http://www.amazon.com/The-Return-ebook/dp/B00FEZ8WQA/ref=sr_1_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1380200290&sr=1-1&keywords=the+return+david+riley

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/518NSrgIcTL._BO2,204,203,200_PIsitb-sticker-arrow-click,TopRight,35,-76_AA278_PIkin4,BottomRight,-64,22_AA300_SH20_OU02_.jpg)
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on September 29, 2013, 04:40:20 PM
I have an interview on the Weird Tales Magazine website in  which I discuss my short story collections and mo Lovecraftian horror novel, The Return, amongst other things.

http://weirdtalesmagazine.com/2013/09/29/the-weird-bookshelf-an-interview-with-century-horror-author-david-a-riley/
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on October 16, 2013, 11:02:45 AM
If there are any reviewers out there who would be interested in getting an electronic copy of my horror novel The Return, just contact me on rileybooks@ntlworld.com and I'll email a kindle-compatible copy to you.

By reviewers I mean anyone who does reviews, whether it's on their own blogs, websites or for magazines, etc.

(http://scontent-a-lhr.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ash4/q82/s720x720/1004683_790354477658397_994618587_n.jpg)

http://www.amazon.com/bloodboundbooks
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on November 06, 2013, 10:51:39 AM
Great first review of my short story collection, The Lurkers in the Abyss, from Shaun Jeffrey on amazon, where he awards it five stars.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/review/RRVAGS0339D0Q/ref=cm_cr_dp_title?ie=UTF8&ASIN=095390329X&channel=detail-glance&nodeID=266239&store=books

http://www.amazon.com/review/R3FJBAHCJY0I6X/ref=cm_cr_dp_title?ie=UTF8&ASIN=095390329X&channel=detail-glance&nodeID=283155&store=books
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on November 09, 2013, 06:29:59 PM
Horror writer Craig Herbertson has provided the first review of my Lovecraftian horror novel The Return on his Heavemakers blog.

"Mr. Fosset, making a brief appearance in this work by David A. Riley says “Dark, bleak, nihilistic stuff. Not the kind of thing to take to bed for a good night’s sleep.” Admirably summarizing this new work by a veteran author who many horror aficionados will have encountered in the legendary Pan Horror series and subsequent ‘best of’ collections."

"Fans of Grudge End, a horrible place full of horrible places, will lap this up. “Even in bright daylight the five-storey building looked dark, forbidding, and sordidly utilitarian.” – a good description of Riley’s bleak uncompromising prose – sparse, economical and clinically scary."

http://www.heavenmakers.com/?p=793
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on December 08, 2013, 11:33:39 AM
There's a detailed review of my short story collection, The Lurkers in the Abyss and Other Tales of Terror on the Vault of Evil site:

http://vaultofevil.proboards.com/thread/5398/david-riley-lurkers-abyss-tales

(https://scontent-b-lhr.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-frc3/1471958_579397128805855_1802276035_n.jpg)
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on December 11, 2013, 12:29:19 PM
(http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-rE9XHHf5usQ/UpeTBpKvsjI/AAAAAAAAE58/sz6v7U7oPHc/s320/71GuKX5g7wL.jpg)
My story Scrap in Dark Visions 1 seems to have got more positive reviews than any story I've written for a while. What pleases me more than anything is that I put a lot of heart and soul into this story, which I think is one of the best I have ever done.

A brief description of it on the Grey Matter Press website:

Scrap by David A. Riley
"Childhood should be a time for leisurely days spent playing in the sun. But for two abused brothers coming to grips with life on their new English estate, a day of adventure opens the door into a world of evil and sets in motion a chain of events from which there seems little hope of escape."

From one reviewer on Amazon:
http://www.amazon.co.uk/review/R33TPV96R6OVUJ/ref=cm_cr_dp_title?ie=UTF8&ASIN=B00F8N6KJY&channel=detail-glance&nodeID=341677031&store=digital-text

"could easily have been a kitchen sink drama, depicting the lives of two brothers growing up in a poverty-stricken council estate in England", adding "Riley chooses to inject a healthy dose of horror, elevating his story to a different, altogether more gruesome level."

From Horror Honeys:
http://www.thehorrorhoneys.com/2013/12/hardcover-honeys-book-of-week.html

"David A. Riley's "Scrap" had a gritty cinematic feel - the story of two down-and-out brothers looking for scrap metal to steal and sell, until they venture into a part of town best left untouched."

From Hellnotes:
http://hellnotes.com/dark-vision-volume-1-a-collection-of-modern-horror-book-review

"David A. Riley’s “Scrap,” concerns two brothers living in England who have been abused at the hands of those who should be caring for them. What they see as a new opportunity to turn their lives around turns out to be anything but. David lures readers into the plot and shocks with the greatest of ease."

From The Horror News Network:
http://www.horrornewsnetwork.net/articles/2-uncategorised/8521-dark-visions-a-collection-of-modern-horror-volume-1

"SCRAP by David A. Riley is in my top two for this collection. It's just so, so good. It's sad and terrifying and just very well written. I would like to read more of Riley's work as well. It seems the words and the stories come easy to him."
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on February 03, 2014, 12:58:33 PM
Brilliant review of my short story collection, The Lurkers in the Abyss and Other Tales of Terror on the hellnotes website.

"In the introduction, David A. Sutton characterizes Riley’s stories as “urban horror” and there is plenty of that here but there is also something more.  Something that, like the work of Ramsey Campbell, is out of synch with the rest of reality.  Even more, with Riley’s fiction, you are left with the feeling that you yourself, at any time, doing the most mundane acts, could be consumed by darkness."

http://hellnotes.com/the-lurkers-in-the-abyss-and-other-tales-of-terror-book-review

(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-dRCcjL48NGc/Ufpk1n4JVfI/AAAAAAAAAcE/rxBsQ25z-qM/s1600/Lurkers+cover.bmp)
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on February 10, 2014, 01:15:03 PM
A great review of The Lurkers in the Abyss and Other Tales of Terror has just been posted on the Horror World website, penned by Mario Guslandi.

"For the fans of classical horror fiction, a very interesting collection by a  modern but classical author."

http://horrorworld.org/hw/2014/02/the-lurkers-in-the-abyss-and-other-tales-of-terror/
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on February 17, 2014, 10:38:24 AM
There's a new review on Amazon for my collection The Lurkers in the Abyss. I wouldn't normally mention Amazon reviews except that this is by Douglas Draa, a contributing editor for Weird Tales magazine:

"Lurkers" has to be the finest collection of single author short stories that I've read in many a year.
This collection is 100% entertainment. There's not a week story in the book. These are simply great stories extremely well told.
Every single one of these stories oozes straight forward old school story telling. And what sets them even higher above the competition than they already are is the hard edge of urbanity with a strong touch of modern sensibility. There's not one drop of ironic post modernism in the book. Just pure grim horror. There's no happy endings in these stories. and that's one of the books joys. Mr. Riley doesn't pull any punches or weaken his tales with false sentimentality. Bad things happen to the undeserving in David's universe.

If you love demons, monsters, zombies, cursed locations, sorcerers returning from the dead, a sly nod to HPL and Stephen king then this collection is for you. And it's no wonder that the titular story made not only the years best list when it came out, but was also chosen by John Pelan for Cemetery Dance's monster "Centuries Best" collection.

The only reason I'm giving this 4 stars is that if I gave it 5 then you would just figure that I was full of it if I gave it five stars.
It's a five star book though in all honesty.

Believe me though, (And I know what I'm talking about. I work for Weird Tales Magazine) I'm a tough sell after reading horror for over 40 years and this is one of the finest new collections that you can find today. Do yourself a big favour and order it now."

http://www.amazon.com/review/RN5531N84Z4PK/ref=cm_cr_dp_title?ie=UTF8&ASIN=095390329X&channel=detail-glance&nodeID=283155&store=books
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on February 18, 2014, 03:44:33 PM
Nice to see my horror novel The Return is included in Robert Essig's Killer Reads in 2013. Thanks Robert!

http://robertessig.blogspot.co.uk/2013/12/some-killer-reads.html

"The Return by David A. Riley is a dark, depressing tale of Lovecraftian mystery and plenty of horror. If you haven't read David A. Riley then you need to pick up one of his 2013 releases and rectify that. He's been publishing short stories professionally for decades and I'm glad he has finally given us such a fantastic novel."

Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on February 19, 2014, 04:27:15 PM
My review of David Williamson's short story collection Herbert Manning's Psychic Circus and Other Dark Tales, published by Hazardous Press, is on hellnotes.

http://hellnotes.com/herbert-mannings-psychic-circus-and-other-dark-tales-book-review

(http://hellnotes.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/02/Herbert-Manning%E2%80%99s-Psychic-Circus-and-Other-Dark-Tales.jpg)
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on February 24, 2014, 09:15:44 AM
I am pleased to announce that Dark Visions 1 from Grey Matter Press has been nominated for a Stoker Award under the category of Superior Achievement in an Anthology. Edited by Anthony Rivera and Sharon Lawson, it includes my 12,000 word story Scrap. Other contributors include Jonathan Maberry, Jay Caselberg, John F.D. Taff, Jason Ridler, Ray Garton, Brian Fatah Steele, Sean Logan, Jonathan Balog, Sarah Johnson, Charles Muir, Milo James Fowler, and Jeff Hemenway.

http://greymatterpress.com/books/dark-visions-one-anthology-main/

(http://greymatterpress.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/02/BramStokerNomination_848x300.png)
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on February 28, 2014, 06:05:32 PM
I've just been featured in Grey Matter Press's Author Spotlight.

http://greymatterpress.com/david-a-riley-author-spotlight/

Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on March 10, 2014, 10:15:46 AM
A sample chapter from my horror novel The Return:

http://davidandrewriley.blogspot.co.uk/p/into-dark-novel.html

(http://scontent-a-lhr.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ash4/q82/s720x720/1004683_790354477658397_994618587_n.jpg)
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on April 17, 2014, 07:28:37 PM
A great review of my horror novel The Return on the Vault of Evil by site administrator Demonik (Kevin Demont):

"Reminds me of photos I saw in a book. Jack the Ripper's last victim. Mary Kelly... At least they were only black and white." Inspector Ray Parks meets what is left of the luckless author of Hell's Cesspit: The Story Of Grudge End.

Meanwhile, back with those fun loving, demon raising Grudge Enders, the return of a prodigal son sparks a new wave of ultra violence.

Correctly nailed for the murder of a South London gangster, Gary Morgan, hit man, high tails it up the motorway, back to his despised childhood neighbourhood Grudge End with the fearsome Broadman mob on his trail. Morgan arrives just in time to witness the demolition of the family home during the slum clearance of Randall Street. He's not sad to see it go. The place holds hideous memories of a dreadful childhood. His father, a brutal drunk, was murdered in 1968 by persons unknown. Who or whatever was responsible broke every bone in his hateful body. His old school-friend Kevin Cross never escaped Grudge End. He's spent the past few decades researching the violent and diabolical history of the area and his findings have left him a paranoid wreck - with good reason. There is evil abroad, always has been, and it can be traced back to the bowels of a disused factory owned by the obscenely wealthy and depraved Malleson family, once the main job providers for the local population.

Pitched somewhere between Get Carter and The Call Of Cthulhu - although, mercifully, the author never allows the story to get bogged down in mythos gibberish - The Return is a fast paced horror thriller with several nasty moments, including some seriously brutal scythe action involving the cover star. Long time Riley readers will appreciate the references to his back catalogue (toward the close, there is even a walk on for Dag and the teen cultists from The Lurkers In The Abyss[/i After what amounts to a post-Beyond decade in the wilderness, what with His His Own Mad Demons, the aforementioned Lurkers ,,,,, and now this debut novel, Mr. R. is on a roll.

Read more: http://vaultofevil.proboards.com/thread/5338/return?page=2#ixzz2zAUgnW7o
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on July 07, 2014, 11:39:59 AM
(https://fbcdn-sphotos-e-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-xfp1/t1.0-9/10464260_686863928059174_8133115015339075981_n.jpg)
Pleased to announce that my short story, His Pale Blue Eyes, is in Tales to Terrify No 130, narrated by Antoinette Bergin. This story was first published in Bite Size Horror, edited by Johnny Mains for Obverse Books in 2011 and is also in my collection The Lurkers in the Abyss and Other Tales of Terror.

http://talestoterrify.com/tales-to-terrify-no130-ferris-riley/
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on July 21, 2014, 11:47:39 PM
Great review of my horror novel The Return on hellnotes.

http://hellnotes.com/the-return-book-review

(http://hellnotes.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/the-return.jpg)

"The Return is a grim, bloody book set firmly in the UK horror tradition, and will make a fine addition to any collection."

Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on August 18, 2014, 06:33:30 AM
I am pleased to announce that Hazardous Press will be publishing a second collection of my short stories, Their Cramped Dark World and Other Dark Tales. This will be the third collection of my stories in total (including The Lurkers in the Abyss and Other Tales of Terror from Shadow Publishing).

The stories included in this new collection will be:

Hoody (first published in When Graveyards Yawn, Crowswing Books, 2006)
A Bottle of Spirits (first published in New Writings in Horror & the Supernatural 2, 1972)
No Sense in Being Hungry, She Thought (first published in Peeping Tom #20, 1996)
Now and Forever More (first published in The Second Black Book of Horror, 2008)
Romero's Children (first published in The Seventh Black Book of Horror, 2010)
Swan Song (first published in the Ninth Black Book of Horror, 2012)
The Farmhouse (first published in New Writings in Horror & the Supernatural 1, 1971)
The Last Coach Trip (first published in The Eighth Black Book of Horror, 2011)
The Satyr's Head (first published in The Satyr's Head & Other Tales of Terror, 1975)
Their Cramped Dark World (first published in The Sixth Black Book of Horror, 2010)

http://davidandrewriley.blogspot.co.uk/p/stories-out-soon.html
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on September 03, 2014, 03:09:00 PM
I have just created a new page on my blog giving details and links to free audio versions of two of my stories.

These are Fish Eye and His Pale Blue Eyes.

Check them out here: http://davidandrewriley.blogspot.co.uk/p/react-academy-of-theatre-arts.html  
Title: Re: Goblin Mire
Post by: David A. Riley on January 16, 2015, 04:48:09 PM
Goblin Mire was originally published by Renaissance E-books.

Goblin Mire is now available as a trade paperback, published by Parallel Universe Publications. 318 pages long, it is £9.50 in the UK and $13.30 in the US.  European copes are 12. Euros. There is also be a kindle version.

Amazon.co.uk  £9.50 http://www.amazon.co.uk/Goblin-Mire-David-Riley/dp/095745354X/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1421422021&sr=8-2&keywords=goblin+mire+david+a.+riley

Amazon.com   $13.30 http://www.amazon.com/Goblin-Mire-David-Riley/dp/095745354X/ref=sr_1_fkmr0_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1421422362&sr=8-1-fkmr0&keywords=goblin+mire+david+a.+riley

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51IKqvsO2oL.jpg)

Many thanks to Joe Young who provided me with the wraparound cover.


Reviewers can receive copies of this book either by contacting Parallel Universe Publications on Facebook or emailing rileybooks@ntlworld.com.
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on January 18, 2015, 11:07:48 AM
Goblin Mire is now available on kindle:

Amazon.co.uk £2.97

Amazon.com $4.50

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51IKqvsO2oL.jpg)

Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on February 13, 2015, 04:58:49 PM
(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-GTS7OwWOdmE/U2oTiuYhgYI/AAAAAAAAArI/370qvV64RHI/s800/Goblin%2BMire%2BFront%2BCover.JPG)

My fantasy novel Goblin Mire will be available free on Kindle for 5 days from Friday the 13th February. I would add, though, that the trade paperback is a handsome looking book with a lovely wraparound cover by Joe Young - and very reasonably priced. Nudge nudge.

trade paperback:

Amazon.co.uk  £6.99
Amazon.com   $12.00

ebook:

Amazon.co.uk £0.00 from February 13th
Amazon.com $0.00 from February 13th
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on March 10, 2015, 10:50:42 AM
(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-eIZPdDiCy98/VNOVDMc2DmI/AAAAAAAAA-A/p7wqOnJmUMA/s1600/CrampedDarkWorldCoverSmall.jpg)

I am pleased to announce that Hazardous Press has published Their Cramped Dark World and Other Tales.

Amazon.co.uk http://www.amazon.co.uk/Their-Cramped-World-Other-Tales/dp/0692385002/ref=sr_1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1425937892&sr=1-2&keywords=Their+Cramped+Dark+World%2C+and+Other+Tales (http://www.amazon.co.uk/Their-Cramped-World-Other-Tales/dp/0692385002/ref=sr_1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1425937892&sr=1-2&keywords=Their+Cramped+Dark+World%2C+and+Other+Tales)
Amazon.com http://www.amazon.com/Their-Cramped-World-Other-Tales/dp/0692385002/ref=sr_1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1425937359&sr=1-2&keywords=Their+Cramped+Dark+World%2C+and+Other+Tales (http://www.amazon.com/Their-Cramped-World-Other-Tales/dp/0692385002/ref=sr_1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1425937359&sr=1-2&keywords=Their+Cramped+Dark+World%2C+and+Other+Tales)


The stories included in this new collection will be:

Hoody (first published in When Graveyards Yawn, Crowswing Books, 2006)
A Bottle of Spirits (first published in New Writings in Horror & the Supernatural 2, 1972)
No Sense in Being Hungry, She Thought (first published in Peeping Tom #20, 1996)
Now and Forever More (first published in The Second Black Book of Horror, 2008)
Romero's Children (first published in The Seventh Black Book of Horror, 2010)
Swan Song (first published in the Ninth Black Book of Horror, 2012)
The Farmhouse (first published in New Writings in Horror & the Supernatural 1, 1971)
The Last Coach Trip (first published in The Eighth Black Book of Horror, 2011)
The Satyr's Head (first published in The Satyr's Head & Other Tales of Terror, 1975)
Their Cramped Dark World (first published in The Sixth Black Book of Horror, 2010)
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on August 03, 2015, 04:26:15 PM
(http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-GBzs9PI9Qac/VVu1mtELGMI/AAAAAAAABKM/Q1bNjAzxefs/s1600/Moloch%2527s%2BChildren.jpg)

My horror novel Moloch's Children will be free on Thursday the 6th August for one day only.

Please feel free to write a review if the urge is there.

trade paperback:
 
amazon.co.uk  £7.99
amazon.com   $9.99

ebook:

amazon.co.uk  £2.99 - free for the 6th August
amazon.com  $4.68 - free for the 6th August
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on December 16, 2015, 08:31:13 PM
(http://i608.photobucket.com/albums/tt168/trashmorgue/theclassical_zpshobfmnhp.jpg)

My zombie story, Dead Ronnie and I, is today's offering on the Vault of Evil's Advent Calendar. I hope anyone who downloads it enjoys the ride! This story is published here for the first time.

Dead Ronnie and I: http://vaultofevil.proboards.com/attachment/download/496

Vault of Evil's Advent Calendar: http://vaultofevil.proboards.com/thread/6164/vault-advent-calendar-christmas-doomed
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on November 03, 2016, 09:53:48 AM
(http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-OPAGl2k7AJw/V32J20fM_gI/AAAAAAAAKEY/5caB_yMGWZEgTKh6XoFHyv4ucTVfQ04UwCK4B/s1600/il_570xN.887124985_4d4k.jpg)

The Gal in the Blue Mask blog just published a lengthy interview with me. For anyone interested, the link to it is here:

http://the-gal-in-the-blue-mask.blogspot.com/

Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: Dave Brzeski on November 03, 2016, 01:32:32 PM
That interview contains my new favourite typo ever! Johnny Maims!  ;D
Interesting to read about why Beyond folded. The exact same thing happened to Far Point, which featured my other half,  Jilly paddock's second ever story sale in the second issue. W.H. Smiths ordered 12,000 copies, sold 3,000, pulped the rest without even bothering to notify the publisher & left him with a huge printing bill. He managed 4 issues, before packing it in.
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on November 03, 2016, 10:00:25 PM
Oddly enough, it was Far Point that gave me the inspiration to start up Beyond serveral years later - though if I had known its experience with Smiths I might have had second thoughts - or not been conned by them into printing and sending them as many copies as I did!

I had a story accepted by Far Point, but unfortunately the magazine folded before it was published.

It was a good magazine while it lasted.

Ha ha. Yes, Johnny Maims!  :o
Title: Re: David A. Riley
Post by: David A. Riley on November 08, 2017, 12:04:27 AM
Just learned that Gallery of Curiosities podcast has accepted a reprint story of mine, After Nightfall, for an audio transmission.

This will be the 7th time this story has been published:

1970 - in a slightly different form - Weird Window 1, published by Shadow Publishing, edited by David A. Sutton
1971 - The Year's Best Horror Fiction 1 - Sphere Books and Daw Books, edited by Richard Davis
1985 - Fantasy Tales #15, edited by Stephen Jones and David A. Sutton
1992 - Tayaschiysya Horror 2, (Таящийся ужас 2) published in Russia, translated by Vladimir Vladimirov (This was an unauthorised reprint which I didn't find out about till years later)
2011 - Zombies! Zombies! Zombies! published by Vintage Books, edited by Otto Penzler
2012 - Zombies: A Compendium of the Living Dead, published by Corvus/Atlantic Books, edited by Otto Penzler
2013 - The Lurkers in the Abyss & Other Tales of Terror, published by Shadoiw Publishing

I have also just had a story published by Mythic magazine (issue 4): A Grim God's Revenge.

(https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-FOXwIwH_PHA/Wdi-QVo39PI/AAAAAAAACII/QpFUyA-7slczBGWv79TDPU3QxH7QrEf1QCLcBGAs/s1600/mythic4cover.jpg)