Author Topic: Black Static  (Read 49844 times)

Offline Roy

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Re: Black Static
« Reply #75 on: October 01, 2010, 09:44:18 am »
Black Static finished its 3rd year with #18 and 8th October will bring Black Static 19 to start its 4th.
The issue's goodies start with part of Ben Baldwin's illustration for Simon Clark's 'They Will Not Rest' along with Stephen Jones as seen by Les Edwards on the cover.

Fiction:
Chain Reaction by Steve Rasnic Tem illustrated by Dave Senecal
Beachcombing by Ray Cluley illustrated by Richard Wagner
The Sleep Mask by Joel Lane
They Will Not Rest by Simon Clark illustrated by Ben Baldwin
The Wound Dresser by Lavie Tidhar illustrated by Daniele Serra

Non-Fiction:
Interference by Christopher Fowler
Electric Darkness by Stephen Volk
Night's Plutonian Shore by Mike O'Driscoll - comment
Case Notes by Peter Tennant Interview with Stephen Jones. Free books. 13 anthologies, including "Never Again", and over 300 stories reviewed.
Blood Spectrum by Tony Lee Over 25 DVDs/Blu-rays reviewed. Free films
White Noise - news
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Offline David A. Riley

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Re: Black Static
« Reply #76 on: October 01, 2010, 10:06:11 am »
Looking forward to getting this through the post.

It was great to have subscribed again (after a lapse) at Fantasycon and bought quite a few back issues I'd missed. Though I still haven't read them all.  ???

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Re: Black Static
« Reply #77 on: October 02, 2010, 01:35:02 am »
I remember Joel Lane. Gosh. I had some truck with him in the mid-nineties. A few differences of opinion over a poetry magazine, as I recall, but I think it ended without bloodshed. At least, when I met him again a few years back in Birmingham, he did actually speak to me. Very briefly.

But I'm hard to ignore, so that doesn't mean anything.  ::)

BS looks like an interesting publication.

Offline Andy C

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Re: Black Static
« Reply #78 on: October 02, 2010, 03:02:27 pm »
I've posted a few more details about the issue, plus a few lo-res spreads, in the Black Static Current Issue section.

Offline Roy

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Re: Black Static
« Reply #79 on: October 29, 2010, 12:46:35 am »
Our next issue, Black Static # 20 will contain an 8,700 word story which is a collaboration between Paul Meloy & Sarah Pinborough - The Compartments of Hell. Due out December so subscribe now to be sure of your copy.

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« Last Edit: October 29, 2010, 12:50:16 am by Roy »

Offline Roy

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Re: Black Static
« Reply #80 on: November 01, 2010, 06:43:23 pm »
If you are in the Liverpool area on 26 Nov we are having a Black Static Showcase at Waterstone's Liverpool One. This will be the second in their Twisted Tales horror fiction readings and TTA authors Graham Joyce, Paul Finch and Simon Kurt Unsworth will provide the chills.

I'll be there with the magazines so its a rare opportunity to buy them in Waterstones and we hope to do more such events if we are anywhere near as successful as that Halloween event.

Start 6 pm, end 8 pm

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Offline Paul Campbell

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Re: Black Static
« Reply #81 on: November 02, 2010, 01:11:12 am »
Roy,

I joined/renewed just as BS#19 came out - but I still haven't received it yet. Hate contacting you guys publicly like this through a forum, but I've PM'd via the TTA address three times this pass week and haven't heard anything yet. Double checked my current account and PayPal definitely deducted the £21 in the second week of October.

Offline Andy C

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Re: Black Static
« Reply #82 on: November 02, 2010, 09:15:25 am »
I replied to your email of 29th October immediately, saying that the main mailing was actually sent before you subscribed but that your copy was posted later and should have arrived by now, therefore I'd send a replacement.

I also responded immediately to yoru email of the following day, and obviously now I was concerned that my email's weren't getting through. I tried again yesterday.

Please check your spam filter. :)

But don't worry, the original copy obviously went missing, and the replacement copy will be with you shortly.

Offline Paul Campbell

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Re: Black Static
« Reply #83 on: November 02, 2010, 09:30:16 am »
I replied to your email of 29th October immediately, saying that the main mailing was actually sent before you subscribed but that your copy was posted later and should have arrived by now, therefore I'd send a replacement.

I also responded immediately to yoru email of the following day, and obviously now I was concerned that my email's weren't getting through. I tried again yesterday.

Please check your spam filter. :)

But don't worry, the original copy obviously went missing, and the replacement copy will be with you shortly.

Cheers Andy!

That's the weird thing - I did check my spam folder! Strange. In all the years I think I've only had one item go astray in the post. Hope you guys can claim the lost issue off the Post Office: I know they cover 1st and 2nd class up to, I believe, £27.

Offline Roy

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Re: Black Static
« Reply #84 on: November 02, 2010, 10:47:00 am »
Hi Paul. Andy's on top of this so no need for further action by me.
If you think you have other communication problems you can e mail me at roy1gray (at) yahoo (dot) co (dot) uk

Offline Paul Campbell

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Re: Black Static
« Reply #85 on: November 27, 2010, 09:03:17 am »
BLACK STATIC 19

Of all the writers, Steve Rasnic Tem’s story was the one I was most looking forward to, having just read and enjoyed his contribution to Stephen Jones’s latest anthology, ‘Visitants: Stories of Fallen Angels & Heavenly Hosts’ (not forgetting his excellent contribution to ‘Subtle Edens’ edited by Allen Ashley).

But it was a crushing disappointment: interminable and with unconvincing dialogue (though I suspect that was affected, but still...). The writing was dead and cold. Now, you could take the cop-out and say, “Well, it was written in the 2nd person, so that’s kinda unavoidable.” Hogwash. All 500 pages of Brian Aldiss’s brilliant new novel, ‘Walcot’, were also written in the 2nd person. It’s warm, it’s moving. It’s his magnum opus. In the end if I’m not ‘inside’ a story - if I’m consciously aware that I’m reading – then no matter what merits it may have, for me it’s failed. I want to lose myself in a story; not feel like I’m slogging my way through a pile of Cliff Notes.

“Beach Combing” by Ray Cluley was brief, but very effective: here a young boy ‘sees’ the memories in the found objects he touches.

Joel Lane is hit and miss for me: his ‘Earthwire’ collection left me cold, but ‘The Terrible Changes’ and ‘The Witnesses Are Gone’ were superb. At his best Lane can completely connect you to the honesty of the emotions he’s conveying. “The Sleep Mask” is good, but I didn’t have a strong reaction to it. It wasn’t a ‘miss’, so perhaps it was just a case of not doing for me what past stories had done better.

Lane’s tale was about a man suffering from a sleep disorder (although with Lane, such matters are just surface details to the deeper layers of his stories). The next tale is “They Will Not Rest” by Simon Clark is also about sleep – only here certain death awaits everyone if they fall asleep. This, then, is a nightmare scenario where people have to stay awake in order to stay alive. One of the best Simon Clark short stories I’ve read in years.

Last is “The Wound Dresser” by Lavie Tidhar. One of the shortest in the magazine, but not a word is wasted. Great tone, extremely effective. Having just read Jones’s angels anthology I was immediately intrigued to see what Tidhar’s angel story would be like – and it’s not at all like any of the contributions to ‘Visitants’! Along with the Clark, one of the strongest stories in the issue.

Despite disappointments, I do admire the range of stories in Black Static, something I never felt with The Third Alternative (although admittedly I bailed on TTA when it had barely reached its teen numbers: for me it was just a miasma of myopic misery. More than anything, what really galled me with the whole ‘slipstream’ malarkey was that all involved were convinced they were reinventing the wheel. Yeah, right. They were doing nothing Brian Aldiss hadn’t already done – better – with his ‘Acid-Head’ stories in the ‘60s. Hell, even on a bad day Aldiss could write circles around the whole lot of them).

All the regular non-fiction comments from Fowler, O’Driscoll and Volk are terrific reads, though all of them concern themselves for the most part with films.

There’s a lengthy interview with Stephen Jones and extensive coverage of recent anthologies. My only real gripe with Black Static is the amount of effort, time and paper – 9 pages – wasted on reviewing the utter schlock of DVD drivel. Really, who cares already? (Leave that nonsense, I say, to Kim Newman and his Empire Magazine column.) I’d much prefer another story or interview...

A note on the layout and design: I have to say, since issue 16 Black Static has become a far more pleasurable read, not least because of the colour; with the b&w everything – I don’t know – just sort of blurred and smudged together. Reading could be a chore at times. Not only does the colour do the artwork more justice, but it helps to separate everything out. Plus I like having all the comments at the beginning, stories in the middle and reviews at the end. It just makes it so much easier to find stuff. For instance, I was looking through some of the b&w back issues and, jeez, trying to find something was a killer: stories, comments and reviews were scattered hither and yon, and not always helpfully labelled. I hope the current design and layout stays the way it is, as I like it just fine.

All in all 19 is a solid issue, if for this humble reader not as good as 18.

Offline Pigasus

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Re: Black Static
« Reply #86 on: November 29, 2010, 09:12:30 pm »
..My only real gripe with Black Static is the amount of effort, time and paper – 9 pages – wasted on reviewing the utter schlock of DVD drivel. Really, who cares already?

Well, I do, for starters... and I think films & TV are a vital part of the genre, just as important as new horror stories.
I can understand if you dislike movies in general, but not all the DVDs reviewed should be considered 'schlock' or 'drivel'.

Blood Spectrum in #19 covers at least half a dozen good-to-great films, plus 3 or 4 interesting/ worthwhile failures.
There are still many fine horror films being made, nowadays, as the magazine's other columnists often point out.

Offline Paul Campbell

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Re: Black Static
« Reply #87 on: November 30, 2010, 12:55:02 am »

I can understand if you dislike movies in general


I don't like movies. I love movies. But - alas - in the 21st century 'movie', 'horror' and 'good' just don't go together!  ;)

Offline Roy

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Re: Black Static
« Reply #88 on: December 08, 2010, 12:03:59 pm »
Interesting comments Paul. Maybe the Peter Tennant advent calendar and David Gentry's art will make up for the abundance of DVD reviews. It is important to cater for the many readers with a yen for movie horror in the magazine and I'm glad I'm not the editor. Plus people like bad horror movies.
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Offline Roy

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Re: Black Static
« Reply #89 on: February 19, 2011, 01:57:53 pm »
Black Static 21 is out now and has two first time authors in the TOC. One of these is Victoria Leslie who lives in Portsmouth and her success is celebrated in her local newspaper, The News. You can see what the photographer thinks about horror fiction writers from his photo
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