Author Topic: In Conversation, A Writer's Perspective  (Read 11255 times)

Offline Ellen Datlow

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Re: In Conversation, A Writer's Perspective
« Reply #15 on: September 23, 2009, 03:10:41 pm »
I notice that he isn't true to his own remit:

"I also wanted to focus on the value and significance of the small press, which has been essentially carrying the torch for horror fiction for the last twenty years, as major publishing houses have lost interest in the field. This meant... Read More I was particularly interested in writers who had a special relationship with various small press imprints, or were uniquely involved in the day-today operation of an independent press."

But Joe Lansdale, Stephen Gallagher, Ray Garton, Mark Morris, Graham Joyce, and Ramsey Campbell (and others, even if some were originally published by small presses & occasionally still are) are all published by BIG PRESSES.

Offline iamacanadian

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Re: In Conversation, A Writer's Perspective
« Reply #16 on: September 24, 2009, 12:29:08 am »
I notice that he isn't true to his own remit:
Quote
I also wanted to focus on the value and significance of the small press, which has been essentially carrying the torch for horror fiction for the last twenty years, as major publishing houses have lost interest in the field. This meant... Read More I was particularly interested in writers who had a special relationship with various small press imprints, or were uniquely involved in the day-today operation of an independent press.

But Joe Lansdale, Stephen Gallagher, Ray Garton, Mark Morris, Graham Joyce, and Ramsey Campbell (and others, even if some were originally published by small presses & occasionally still are) are all published by BIG PRESSES.

Actually, this highlights the difference in the UK and North America. The Mainstream Presses of the UK can still be highly resistant to anything remotely horror-flavoured. Ramsey Campbell, highly respected though he is, wasn't carried by a large publisher for some time (unless you count PS Publishing). Likewise, Mark Morris only recently got his gig with Leisure, having spent some time out in the literary wood-shed after Piakus simply stopped returning his calls.

Some, such as Mr. Lansdale (barring the one movie adaptation), haven't really achieved 'wide-stream name-recognition' in the way that Mr. Gallagher has, for one example.

The others you mention, are very much part of the main-stream publishing world, you're quite right. They are also, however, still published widely by the small presses of both sides of the Atlantic, and haven't ever looked down at the opportunity to make a fraction of their usual fees from a small press outfit. In some ways, they're 'honorary small press authors' for their long faithful service.

Let's not split hairs, however, as this question of the moment hasn't anything to do with large and small presses, and is an entirely different debate altogether. Faber & Faber qualifies as "small press" according to some definitions, for instance.
Ian Alexander Martin; Proprietor, Atomic Fez Publishing


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Re: In Conversation, A Writer's Perspective
« Reply #17 on: September 25, 2009, 12:22:39 pm »
I've been thinking. I've not yet seen the James Cooper book, but, possibly, 16 male writers *could* honestly give more of a representative view of the 'male' and 'feminine' spirits than, say, 8 men and 8 women. Some men contain more of the 'feminine' spirit than some women do.