Author Topic: Allyson Bird  (Read 35641 times)

Offline allybird

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Allyson Bird
« on: March 06, 2010, 12:53:06 PM »
I've been busy working on a new collection WINE AND RANK POISON out in time for Fantasycon, from DARK REGIONS PRESS. Introduction by Joe. R. Lansdale and artwork by Dani Serra.

My debut collection BULL RUNNING FOR GIRLS won best collection in the BRITISH FANTASY SOCIETY AWARDS, last year.

Ellen Datlow gave me the following honourable mentions in her BEST HORROR OF THE YEAR - 1.

Bird, Allyson “The Bone Grinder,” Bull Running for Girls.
Also for these stories from the same collection...
“Bull Running,” 
“The Caul Bearer,” 
“The Conical Witch” 
“Hunter’s Moon,” 
“In the Hall of the Mountain King.”

ISIS UNBOUND, my debut novel, also from DARK REGIONS PRESS, will be out in the autumn.

I have a story in the current BFS YEARBOOK (published by this society) THE CONVENT AT BAZZANO.

Another story, THE BLACK SWAN OF ODESSA from Ex - Occidente is in...



http://exoccidente.com/morphine.html

THE MASTER IN CAFÉ MORPHINE: A HOMAGE TO MIKHAIL BULGAKOV
Edited by D.T. Ghetu
Cover art: C. C. Askew
Final Publication Date: February 20th MMX
ISBN: 978-929-7694-23-5
Sewn hardcover, limited to 250 copies, 500 pp with end papers and a full-color frontispiece.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

"The séance is over! Maestro! Hack out a march!"

'Because where there is Art, there is no Devil. This is a homage to Mikhail Bulgakov, last Prince and Master of the White Twilight lineage. Dissident extraordinaire, wayward Dandy, fabulous anti-hero of the Great Soviets, Doctor, Mystic and tamer of the Deamons from the Highest Courts of Hell, genial novelist and loyal soldier of the White Army, Morphia addict, Reactionary and Visionary, Mikhail Bulgakov remains to this day a singular man and a remarkable figure in the entire history of Promethean Literature. More than a marvelous writer, as the cynics and the cloaca of the literary critics want us to believe, Mikhail Bulgakov was one of the few Eschatological forerunners of the much ill-fated XXth century.'

I'll post covers of all of the above - soon :>) but they can be seen on here...

www.birdsnest.me.uk



« Last Edit: March 15, 2010, 09:44:05 AM by allybird »

Offline Stephen Volk

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Re: Allyson Bird
« Reply #1 on: March 07, 2010, 01:45:35 PM »
Thanks for setting up this board Ally: I've just put myself on. I hope the idea gathers steam.

Steve Lockley

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Re: Allyson Bird
« Reply #2 on: March 07, 2010, 02:58:48 PM »
Thanks for the invite Ally - I managed to find my way here

Offline allybird

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Re: Allyson Bird
« Reply #3 on: March 07, 2010, 04:55:47 PM »
No probs...I wrote emails to quite a few people and have asked them to pass the word on...so as news get around more will come and share news etc.... We want to build it so writers can have a place where they are very welcome, set up a thread and say they have had their first story published ....to ..... anything! 

If authors could try and link back to the BFS...authors' section from their webs/blogs/fb whatever they want that would bring more 'traffic' through :>) Big thanks to Stephen for setting up etc!

Offline Jen

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Re: Allyson Bird
« Reply #4 on: March 08, 2010, 05:16:12 PM »
So tell us about the very intriguing sounding Isis Unbound!   :-*

Offline allybird

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Re: Allyson Bird
« Reply #5 on: March 08, 2010, 05:26:12 PM »
Hi Jen,

I'm still working on the last story for the new collection which has to be in before WHC...I sent the proposal for the novel at the same time as the collection and ISIS UNBOUND isn't finished yet. I've got from April to June to do that... a little about it. 

I started to think about what if Anthony and Cleopatra had won the battle of Actium instead of lost...I knew that I wanted to set it in England and thought about pyramids across the Cheshire plain...

Inspired by Mary Shelley, Percy Bysshe Shelley’s, Prometheus Unbound, and
Rider Haggard/R.E.Howard to some extent, ISIS UNBOUND is set in 1890’s
Manceastre, Britanniae, ruled by a new governor general, Clovis Domitius
Corbulo. He is related to Cleopatra LV descendant of Anthony and
Cleopatra who won the battle of Actium two thousand years ago. Only a god
can kill a god. Nepythys has killed her sister, ISIS, and therefore the dead
cannot pass over to the underworld. Ella, eighteen and Loli - age ten, are
the daughters of Ptolemy Child. The sons and daughters of embalmers are
expected to begin instruction in the embalming process at an unusually young
age. Against this background we follow the girls on their quest in Manceastre and Alexandria to discover the greatest mystery of all –
involving ISIS herself. An ISIS who will stop at nothing to ensure her own
survival…

When I go back to it in April for another run through no doubt it will change. :)

 
« Last Edit: March 08, 2010, 05:42:06 PM by allybird »

Offline allybird

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Re: Allyson Bird
« Reply #6 on: March 09, 2010, 08:27:53 AM »
Forgot to mention my novelette which is out of print now....FOR YOU FAUSTINE published by Pendragon Press. A story set on Coney island about the Lamia and Swinburne's poetry.

It can be read in ISSUU flip book version on the Pendragon site. In archives...September 2009. You need to scroll just a little.

http://www.pendragonpress.net/2009/09/

And I forgot to put a link from the news page on my site back to the society to help promote the society and membership etc...I'll do that tonight :>).


« Last Edit: March 09, 2010, 08:34:53 AM by allybird »

Offline allybird

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Re: Allyson Bird
« Reply #7 on: March 10, 2010, 10:24:36 AM »
Steve Lockley prompted this post..

What is horror?

If you use the internet, look up horror fiction on wikipiedia www.wikipedia.org  it states that it is ‘any medium which intends to scare, unsettle or horrify.’ If we just take the last 2,000 years we could mention revenge tragedy written by the Roman stoic philosopher/dramatist SENECA and also OVID both mentioned as being sources for SHAKESPEARE’S Titus Andronicus (one of the more famous full blown blood bath revenge tragedies, cited as having been written during Shakespeare’s Quentin Tarantino period). In this play we have rape, murder, and so much mutilation that the Victorians put it to one side. It has seen a revival lately and was put on at the Globe Theatre in London 2006, directed by Lucy Bailey. Think about original fairy tales for children – quite gruesome sometimes, told perhaps as a warning to children.
   There is the good old fashioned ghost story. DICKENS wrote A Christmas Carol (by the end of that tale Scrooge indeed treated people a little better).
Oscar WILDE—The Picture of Dorian Gray. There are always consequences for usurping the natural order of things. Be careful what you wish for— for indeed it may come true; The Monkey’s Paw by W. W. JACOBS comes to mind. Be careful what you dabble with, it might just come back to haunt/kill you—Frankenstein by Mary SHELLEY.
   Exotic places and travel are often featured in weird tales. We have stories set against a background of ‘arctic ghostliness’ in The Captain of the Polestar by Arthur Conan DOYLE. A quote from TENNYSON, ‘nature—red in tooth and claw,’ aptly introduces a story by David MORRELL called They. Incidentally this story which appears in Best New Horror 18, edited by Stephen JONES focuses on the creatures that I am most afraid of—snakes.
   We could look at the gothic novel Northanger Abbey by Jane AUSTIN, Wuthering Heights—Emily BRONTE. Lovecraftian cosmic horror—which explores our place in a chaotic universe. In The Willows by Algernon BLACKWOOD travellers camp by the Danube river in the worst spot possible where another dimension touches our own.
   H.P. LOVECRAFT can conjure up more identifiable characters such as the witch in The Dreams in the Witch House.  Robert AICKMAN—simply read any strange story by him. Fritz LEIBER presents us with 1970’s modern eerie scariness in Our Lady of Darkness.
   There are writers who explore reality and madness, Robert BLOCH’S Psycho. Silence of the Lambs by Thomas HARRIS and One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest by Ken KESEY. Alice SEBOLD’S Booker prize winner, The Lovely Bones. This one is a compelling read about the murder of a child.
   Joe R LANSDALE serves plenty of humour with his horror in this little novella, Bubba Ho-Tep, where an ancient mummy is terrorizing a retirement home. It is a comedy, (Elvis and J.F.K have ended up there) but could be seen to be about aging and growing old in a society which puts youthfulness first. Thomas LIGOTTI—modern writer of the weird tale, including his collection, The Shadow at the Bottom of the World to, well—whatever causes the hairs on the back of your neck to stand up? From tragedy to gothic to weird, the new weird and the miserablist writers.

When I was younger films like The Poltergeist, Quatermass and the Pit, Dr Who, the witches in Macbeth, Stephen KING’S Salem’s Lot, any ghost story on the telly would do it and now the more traditional work of LOVECRAFT, the strange stories of Robert AICKMAN and watching the news does the same. Horror is a part of life, whether it is going through the harrowing experience of nursing a dearly loved sick relative or facing the fears that dwell deep within our own minds.
   To ignore horror is to ignore what is a part of the world. One of my own stories highlights the terrible fate of Eastern European women sold into sex slavery, another highlights the grief and confusion experienced when a girl loses her mother.  Sometimes I write comedic horror—it just depends on how I want to convey a theme, a story or an emotion.
   For me there are many reasons why I write it. I like to look at all aspects of the genre. I can write a more traditional tale— a ghost story set in Robin Hood’s Bay or a story where the imagined or the supernatural cannot be easily discerned. I can write about real life events or not? Psychological horror or graphic horror? I prefer to build up tension and have a reason for writing it. Not just gore for gore’s sake that doesn’t advance plot.
   
« Last Edit: March 10, 2010, 11:14:31 AM by allybird »

Offline Dave Price

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Re: Allyson Bird
« Reply #8 on: March 10, 2010, 02:02:49 PM »
Hi Allyson, just dropping by. Just signed up to this forum when I saw your thread. Think it's a great idea.

Offline allybird

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Re: Allyson Bird
« Reply #9 on: March 10, 2010, 02:04:42 PM »
Good to see you Dave! It is a great little place to share news and catch up  :)

Offline allybird

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Re: Allyson Bird
« Reply #10 on: March 10, 2010, 02:35:35 PM »
Forgot to mention that I'm on a panel at WHC on the Saturday...this is the one...

FEMME FATALES
A Bird, E Datlow, T Lee
M McHugh (mod.), S McLeod,
S Pinbourgh

Offline Colin (Black Abyss)

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Re: Allyson Bird
« Reply #11 on: March 10, 2010, 06:11:43 PM »
From small acorns, great oaks grow Allyson. Thanks for helping to set this up, it's an excellent resource. :)

Offline allybird

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Re: Allyson Bird
« Reply #12 on: March 10, 2010, 06:23:27 PM »
Thank you Colin!

I wanted to say that to you before when Steve put your comment up at the beginning of this board but I couldn't...I'm not a mod or anything to do with the committee.  I'm just working on this one project for the BFS.  :)

Can you mention it on your blog to increase traffic through and encourage membership of the society?
« Last Edit: March 12, 2010, 05:16:21 PM by allybird »

louisebohmer

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Re: Allyson Bird
« Reply #13 on: March 12, 2010, 06:49:47 PM »
Congratulations on all these recent project, Allyson! I've got to catch up with some of your stories. They all sound very interesting. Like what you said here, in your second to last paragraph of your post of 'what is horror?'

Quote
To ignore horror is to ignore what is a part of the world. One of my own stories highlights the terrible fate of Eastern European women sold into sex slavery, another highlights the grief and confusion experienced when a girl loses her mother.  Sometimes I write comedic horror—it just depends on how I want to convey a theme, a story or an emotion.

My favorite kind of horror weaves an unknown, or supernatural fear, with true to life horror.

Offline allybird

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Re: Allyson Bird
« Reply #14 on: March 12, 2010, 07:00:28 PM »
Thank you Louise!

'My favorite kind of horror weaves an unknown, or supernatural fear, with true to life horror.' Certainly!

'Horror' covers so much but my favourite fiction has to be the strange stories of Lisa Tuttle and Aickman.

« Last Edit: March 16, 2010, 03:36:19 PM by allybird »