Author Topic: Rhys Hughes  (Read 33354 times)

Offline GeoffNelder

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Re: Rhys Hughes
« Reply #180 on: July 27, 2017, 09:13:28 PM »
You always come up with great titles, Rhys. I know you're using that trick of the juxtaposition of the unexpected, but it works so well with yours. eg The Smell of Telescopes. Brilliant. It's like a kid in an exam is asked, "What are telescopes for?"
"Why, to smell of course!"
Love it. Gonna check it out.

Offline rhysaurus

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Re: Rhys Hughes
« Reply #181 on: July 28, 2017, 10:51:17 AM »
Thanks Geoff!

Titles are really important to me. I want them to be like really short poems or one sentence stories, lyrical and enigmatic. I wrote a blog piece a while ago about this, which probably sounds more self-important than it is supposed to be... Also many of the titles on this particular list have actually been turned into stories in the past seven years.

But anyway, here it is:

http://postmodernmariner.blogspot.co.uk/2011/07/brief-list-of-titles-for-unwritten.html?m=0

...and thanks again! :-)

Offline GeoffNelder

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Re: Rhys Hughes
« Reply #182 on: July 28, 2017, 11:33:28 AM »
Some great titles there.
My first scifi novel bore the title: Exit, Pursued by a Bee
Just a little tweak of the famous Shakespearean stage direction in Winter's Tale
I like a touch of enigmatic too. One of my shorts is 466Hz - yet to be published but will be in an antho. Another is Gravity's Tears published by Jupiter a while back.

As you say sometimes an intriguing title conjures up scenarios in the reader's mind before he or she has read it.  A lovely pastime.

Offline rhysaurus

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Re: Rhys Hughes
« Reply #183 on: July 28, 2017, 01:33:52 PM »
Absolutely! And an elaborate and highly original can be like a seed that controls the growth of the story, so it can help an author be more imaginative and inventive and unusual during the writing process, because when an author is free to write anything at all the reflex is to fall back on low-level patterns and cliches.

Offline rhysaurus

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Re: Rhys Hughes
« Reply #184 on: August 25, 2017, 11:44:41 AM »
Lots of talk about Lovecraft in the air at the moment, so....

I have written many Lovecraft-inspired stories in my time. Most of them have a strong whimsical or ironic element and a few are downright parodies. Two of them, 'The Bicycle Centaur' and 'How Gangrene was my Sally', appeared in the recent Cthulhu Cymraeg anthologies. I am currently planning a new one called 'The Whisperer in Darkness Bangs his Head on an Unseen Projection' and I am also toying with the idea of writing another called 'The People of Colour Out of Space'.

The parodist and whimsical experimenter contributes to the genre of the weird by taking the hidden logical absurdities that are already in the structures of the texts of the key authors and playing with them to reveal them for what they are, and then extrapolating from them to produce a wild flight of fancy. The ideal is to simultaneously push the form forward and make much mischief with it. One of my older Lovecraft-inspired experiments that appeared in one of my collections many years ago is available to be read online here:

A Languid Elagabalus of the Tombs
http://www.tartaruspress.com/assets/languid.pdf

Parodies are not disrespectful. What is disrespectful is to ignore an author and take no inspiration from that author. Parodies are indicative simply of a playful nature.