Author Topic: Rhys Hughes  (Read 42463 times)

Offline GeoffNelder

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Re: Rhys Hughes
« Reply #180 on: July 27, 2017, 09:13:28 pm »
You always come up with great titles, Rhys. I know you're using that trick of the juxtaposition of the unexpected, but it works so well with yours. eg The Smell of Telescopes. Brilliant. It's like a kid in an exam is asked, "What are telescopes for?"
"Why, to smell of course!"
Love it. Gonna check it out.

Offline rhysaurus

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Re: Rhys Hughes
« Reply #181 on: July 28, 2017, 10:51:17 am »
Thanks Geoff!

Titles are really important to me. I want them to be like really short poems or one sentence stories, lyrical and enigmatic. I wrote a blog piece a while ago about this, which probably sounds more self-important than it is supposed to be... Also many of the titles on this particular list have actually been turned into stories in the past seven years.

But anyway, here it is:

http://postmodernmariner.blogspot.co.uk/2011/07/brief-list-of-titles-for-unwritten.html?m=0

...and thanks again! :-)

Offline GeoffNelder

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Re: Rhys Hughes
« Reply #182 on: July 28, 2017, 11:33:28 am »
Some great titles there.
My first scifi novel bore the title: Exit, Pursued by a Bee
Just a little tweak of the famous Shakespearean stage direction in Winter's Tale
I like a touch of enigmatic too. One of my shorts is 466Hz - yet to be published but will be in an antho. Another is Gravity's Tears published by Jupiter a while back.

As you say sometimes an intriguing title conjures up scenarios in the reader's mind before he or she has read it.  A lovely pastime.

Offline rhysaurus

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Re: Rhys Hughes
« Reply #183 on: July 28, 2017, 01:33:52 pm »
Absolutely! And an elaborate and highly original can be like a seed that controls the growth of the story, so it can help an author be more imaginative and inventive and unusual during the writing process, because when an author is free to write anything at all the reflex is to fall back on low-level patterns and cliches.

Offline rhysaurus

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Re: Rhys Hughes
« Reply #184 on: August 25, 2017, 11:44:41 am »
Lots of talk about Lovecraft in the air at the moment, so....

I have written many Lovecraft-inspired stories in my time. Most of them have a strong whimsical or ironic element and a few are downright parodies. Two of them, 'The Bicycle Centaur' and 'How Gangrene was my Sally', appeared in the recent Cthulhu Cymraeg anthologies. I am currently planning a new one called 'The Whisperer in Darkness Bangs his Head on an Unseen Projection' and I am also toying with the idea of writing another called 'The People of Colour Out of Space'.

The parodist and whimsical experimenter contributes to the genre of the weird by taking the hidden logical absurdities that are already in the structures of the texts of the key authors and playing with them to reveal them for what they are, and then extrapolating from them to produce a wild flight of fancy. The ideal is to simultaneously push the form forward and make much mischief with it. One of my older Lovecraft-inspired experiments that appeared in one of my collections many years ago is available to be read online here:

A Languid Elagabalus of the Tombs
http://www.tartaruspress.com/assets/languid.pdf

Parodies are not disrespectful. What is disrespectful is to ignore an author and take no inspiration from that author. Parodies are indicative simply of a playful nature.


Offline rhysaurus

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Re: Rhys Hughes
« Reply #185 on: November 21, 2017, 03:35:29 pm »
I am delighted to announce publication of my latest book, World Muses, a collection of linked fictions that are about inspirational women from eighty different countries and cultures.

Although it might be described as a story collection, in fact I regard it as more akin to an unorthodox novel. Indeed I personally see it as similar to Italo Calvino's Invisible Cities, but with women instead of cities.

And yet let's not misunderstand the purpose of my book. It is a celebration of diversity and difference rather than an array of libidinous exploits: each chapter (or story) generally features the woman as the victor, the active force, as well as the catalyst.



There is a limited edition deluxe hardback. There is also a paperback version and an ebook edition.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/World-Muses-Rhys-Hughes/dp/1979367906/ref=tmm_pap_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=1511270911&sr=8-2

Thanks for listening!

Offline rhysaurus

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Re: Rhys Hughes
« Reply #186 on: November 27, 2017, 04:16:33 pm »
Yule Do Nicely has just been published.

This book has been assembled in order to celebrate the festive season. It includes work from the span of the past quarter century. The first twenty-four tales form a weird advent calendar from December 1st to 24th. Then it is Christmas Day and time for the stocking and the twenty-eight little strange tales inside it. Merry Xmas!



This book is available as paperback and as an ebook from Amazon and elsewhere. It is priced very low. 2.99 for the print edition and 99p for the ebook. This is as it should be at this time of year...
https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/1976234832/ref=sr_1_sc_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1511525719&sr=8-1-spell&keywords=yule+do+nciely

I have added the title to the blog where I keep track of all my published books to date, where there is also information about the contents of each volume. This blog is called Aardvark Caesar and goes right back to my first published book, Worming the Harpy, more than twenty years ago.
http://aardvarkcaesar.blogspot.co.uk/

Thanks for listening!

Offline rhysaurus

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Re: Rhys Hughes
« Reply #187 on: March 10, 2018, 12:44:55 pm »
This just arrived for me in the mail. It's a new magazine that seeks to recreate the ambience of the American pulp SF and Weird mags of the 1930s. Issue #2 here includes my novelette 'Swallowing the Amazon' which is an adventure with dinosaurs set in Africa.

The next issue will be themed around 'body snatching'.



It's available on Amazon and elsewhere. The publisher, Tom English, has produced some great books in his time!

Offline rhysaurus

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Re: Rhys Hughes
« Reply #188 on: May 22, 2018, 11:56:21 am »
My new book has just been published and this one is a little different from all the others, even though all the others are already rather different from each other. It is different because it's a collection of experimental OuLiPo fictions. I have talked about OuLiPo many times over the past thirty years. It is a type of writing that is still relatively unknown in the English writing world.

My book contains a selection of OuLiPo works that are divided into categories. In the first section, there are stories in which I applied simple arithmetical rules to the creation of the texts. These are stories that consist of x sections, each section with x paragraphs, each paragraph having x sentences, each sentence made up of x words. The value of  'x' increases from one to seven, therefore the lengths of the texts rapidly increases too. The texts are individual pieces, yet they also work together to create a sum greater than the parts.

The second section features stories with a much more complex structure. OuLiPo is about the application of logical constraints that must be adhered to strictly in order to stimulate the imagination and push the creative impulse in unexpected directions. There are many official logical constraints and in the past I have applied several of these to various tales. But I also wanted to invent my own constraint and thus I devised one that I call "greater or equal to 2n plus one" because it consists of story grids that can be read coherently across each row, down every column and along the main diagonals, but it is also possible that other unplanned stories exist on other diagonals or in meandering courses through the grids. Some of the more advanced grids are asymmetrical and present even greater opportunities for readings paths.

The third section is a logico-erotic story in which the workings of progressively more intricate logic gates control the action of the sexual partners who are the objects of the study. I wanted to combine two seemingly irreconcilable functions, namely sensuality and logic. The boolean algebra that determines the outcome of each encounter therefore acquires a physicality that is surely quite new and unexpected.



My book can be ordered directly from the publisher (Eibonvale Press) or from Amazon and other online bookshops.