Author Topic: Withcfinder General play on Radio 4  (Read 2185 times)

Terry Grimwod

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Withcfinder General play on Radio 4
« on: March 08, 2010, 06:16:07 pm »
A wonderful play about the makiing of he 1960s film "The Witchfinder General" was aired on Radio 4 last Saturday aftenoon. It focussed on the relationship between Vincent Price and the film's director, the yong Michael Reeves. There ws a very tonue-in-cheek feeliing to the lpay but it was inriguing and very revealing about the British horror film industry of the time. It was called "The Blood Beast Terror" or some such and undoubtad;y availablel on the BBC radio iPlayrer or whatever it is. Check it out! Vincent Price lives again.....

Offline CarolineC

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Re: Withcfinder General play on Radio 4
« Reply #1 on: March 08, 2010, 09:41:13 pm »
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Offline CarolineC

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Re: Withcfinder General play on Radio 4
« Reply #2 on: March 08, 2010, 09:43:10 pm »
Ooooo, and with that being my five-hundredth post here, I've turned into a Barbarian Monarch according to the label by my name on the left. Vincent Price would have been proud!  :D
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Terry Grimwod

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Re: Withcfinder General play on Radio 4
« Reply #3 on: March 09, 2010, 06:41:15 pm »
I love Vincent Price films. they  remind me when I was a kid, being allowed to stay up late on Friday nights when here was always a good slice of hammer (and hammy) horror. I saw them all, "Usher", "Pendulum", "Charles Dexter Ward" and always the wonderful Vincent Price hamming it up, oozing charm and menace. There's no one like him anymore. "Witchfinder General" however, was his greatest role because he underplayed it and suddenly the corny old moustache-twister was genuinely menacing and nasty. And there was depth to the performance. Okay, the film is creaky, full of 1960-ishness and inaccurate hairstyles but it really was Price’s finest hour.

Incidentally, I have read the novel, “The Witchfinder General” which is by Ronald Bassett and well worth checking out. I am interested in Matthew Hopkins because I was born and raised in Suffolk, the country in which Hopkins did most of his nefarious deeds. I’ve written a play about him called “Pyewackett and Vinegar Tom”, the names of some of the familiars claimed by one of his victims. I haven’t been able to get it performed yet, but one day…

Regards
   Terry