Author Topic: TFF Reviews  (Read 9411 times)

Offline Djibril

  • Thaumaturge
  • ***
  • Posts: 347
    • View Profile
    • The Future Fire
Reviewing opportunity!
« Reply #30 on: March 20, 2016, 05:39:11 PM »
Intermezzo:

We've just sent out this month’s listing of titles available for review to the TFF-R reviews team. If there are any reviewers out there who might be interested in taking a look and reviewing something for us, please give me a shout (email nonfiction@futurefire.net, or comment here).
____________________________________________
Editor, The Future Fire http://futurefire.net/

Offline Djibril

  • Thaumaturge
  • ***
  • Posts: 347
    • View Profile
    • The Future Fire
Re: TFF Reviews
« Reply #31 on: March 22, 2016, 11:20:17 PM »
Andy Sawyer reviews Nick Wood's Azanian Bridges from Newcon Press, an alternative history set in a South Africa in which apartheid never fell. "There is much to enjoy in this perceptive tale," and "the learning process comes from reading and enjoying the story." Highly recommended.
____________________________________________
Editor, The Future Fire http://futurefire.net/

Offline Djibril

  • Thaumaturge
  • ***
  • Posts: 347
    • View Profile
    • The Future Fire
Re: TFF Reviews
« Reply #32 on: April 08, 2016, 02:26:32 PM »
Małgorzata Mika reviews Gareth Durasow’s Endless Running Games,  SF/fantasy poetry collection from Dog Horn Publishing, which invites a reader into a world which Alice would find more daunting than the Queen’s Croquet Ground…
____________________________________________
Editor, The Future Fire http://futurefire.net/

Offline Djibril

  • Thaumaturge
  • ***
  • Posts: 347
    • View Profile
    • The Future Fire
Re: TFF Reviews
« Reply #33 on: April 14, 2016, 09:21:48 PM »
Cait Coker reviews Kate Forsyth's The Rebirth of Rapunzel: A Mythic Biography of the Maiden in the Tower, a collection of essays from Fablecroft Publishing, that also contains a translation of one of the first written versions of the Rapunzel story: Charlotte-Rose de la Force’s ‘Persinette.’ Cait calls this “a fascinating and readable collection […]. I highly recommend it for anyone interested in fairy tales, genre, or honestly, just writing.”
____________________________________________
Editor, The Future Fire http://futurefire.net/

Offline Djibril

  • Thaumaturge
  • ***
  • Posts: 347
    • View Profile
    • The Future Fire
Re: TFF Reviews
« Reply #34 on: May 11, 2016, 10:50:43 PM »
Andy Sawyer reviews Peter Tieryas’s United States of Japan, from Angry Robot Books, an obvious comparison to PK Dick’s Man in the High Castle in that it tells of an alternate history of the USA where Japan won WW2. Andy examines some weaknesses of the premise as well as strengths of the book in its own terms (Mecha-warfare being high among them!) and concludes that “the novel is both very like Dick and not at all like The Man in the High Castle, and Peter Tieryas has done well in acknowledging influence and remaining determined to be his own man.”
____________________________________________
Editor, The Future Fire http://futurefire.net/

Offline Djibril

  • Thaumaturge
  • ***
  • Posts: 347
    • View Profile
    • The Future Fire
Re: TFF Reviews
« Reply #35 on: May 18, 2016, 11:31:50 PM »
Rachel Verkade reviews Joel Lane's posthumous Scar City, a dark, bleak and pessimistic collection, through which the author's humanity an compassion nevertheless shine, and which she describes as “a fitting epitaph to a man well-acquainted with the sadness and loneliness inherent in the world.”
____________________________________________
Editor, The Future Fire http://futurefire.net/

Offline Djibril

  • Thaumaturge
  • ***
  • Posts: 347
    • View Profile
    • The Future Fire
Re: TFF Reviews
« Reply #36 on: May 26, 2016, 11:03:15 PM »
TFF-R’s Małgorzata Mika reviews Ana Matronic’s Robot Universe. Legendary Automatons and Androids from the Ancient World to the Distant Future, a beautiful coffee-table book from the Scissor Sisters-frontwoman, divided more or less equally between science fictional and fantastical robots from cinema and other fiction, and the most advanced robots and automata from experimental and commercial ventures in our own world. Małgorzata found this book not entirely academically rigorous or well-structured, but that is not its point: it is an engaging and entertaining read, provoking the imagination and awakening curiosity…
____________________________________________
Editor, The Future Fire http://futurefire.net/

Offline Djibril

  • Thaumaturge
  • ***
  • Posts: 347
    • View Profile
    • The Future Fire
Re: TFF Reviews
« Reply #37 on: June 08, 2016, 09:56:39 PM »
Kate Onyett reviews Kevin McAllion’s Moristoun, from Austin Macauley, the story of an island populated entirely by the afterlife of Scottish suicides. Kate found this less bleak than expected, and concludes that “although the similes may get a little dense in places, the premise is sustained, and charmingly so, with great aplomb.”
____________________________________________
Editor, The Future Fire http://futurefire.net/

Offline Djibril

  • Thaumaturge
  • ***
  • Posts: 347
    • View Profile
    • The Future Fire
Re: TFF Reviews
« Reply #38 on: June 15, 2016, 10:56:53 PM »
Wendy Bousfield reviews Lavie Tidhar’s Central Station, a fantastically inventive, anarchic, strangely-not-dystopian future novel set at the first space station, among a multi-ethnic and multi-lingual community on the borders of Jaffa and Tel Aviv. Tidhar has not only created a world where humanity is in the process of being transformed, evolved by immersive, telepathic net connection; has not only created not one but two syntactically consistent future languages, but he has also written a literary masterpiece that, Wendy feels, deserves to be read much more widely than the speculative fiction circles in which he is recognized.
____________________________________________
Editor, The Future Fire http://futurefire.net/

Offline Djibril

  • Thaumaturge
  • ***
  • Posts: 347
    • View Profile
    • The Future Fire
Re: TFF Reviews
« Reply #39 on: June 29, 2016, 09:01:28 PM »
This week Margrét Helgadóttir reviews Anne Michaud’s Whispered Echoes: An urban fantasy, the first volume in a five-part YA epic about a young ghost seer learning that she has a part to play in a fight against supernatural evil and a rogue mental institution. Margrét found it a bit short, but concludes that it is nevertheless “a good start to a series, and if you like paranormal stories, strong girls, mysteries and haunting tales, this is worth your time.”
____________________________________________
Editor, The Future Fire http://futurefire.net/

Offline Djibril

  • Thaumaturge
  • ***
  • Posts: 347
    • View Profile
    • The Future Fire
Re: TFF Reviews
« Reply #40 on: July 05, 2016, 10:46:34 PM »
Kate Onyett reviews Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam and Peter Brewer’s Strange Monsters: A Music & Words Collaboration. The poems speak of “finding voice, of rising above confusion, of making one’s own way,” and are accompanied by music, “good: with discordant jazz and mood rhythms, it disturbs a placid listening experience, edgifying it and making it an active effort to hold onto ideas.”
____________________________________________
Editor, The Future Fire http://futurefire.net/

Offline Djibril

  • Thaumaturge
  • ***
  • Posts: 347
    • View Profile
    • The Future Fire
Re: TFF Reviews
« Reply #41 on: July 14, 2016, 09:02:38 PM »
Kathryn Allan reviews Walidah Imarisha & adrienne maree brown’s Octavia’s Brood: Science Fiction Stories from Social Justice Movements from AK Press. A book that did not start as science fiction that addressed social issues, as we’re familiar with, but that started as social activism and dared to dream with a literary boldness we normally think of as reserved for we SF and fantasy types… As the editor puts it: “Whenever we try to envision a world without war, without violence, without prisons, without capitalism, we are engaging in speculative fiction.” Kathryn concludes that “the stories in Octavia’s Brood are the strongest when read together; they each give definition to the shape of social justice movements today and spin out worlds they hope to make in the future.”
____________________________________________
Editor, The Future Fire http://futurefire.net/

Offline Djibril

  • Thaumaturge
  • ***
  • Posts: 347
    • View Profile
    • The Future Fire
Re: TFF Reviews
« Reply #42 on: July 23, 2016, 02:51:07 PM »
Cait Coker reviews Anna Kyle, Omega Rising from World Weaver Press, a paranormal romance in the blockbuster and popcorn vein, but which labours less over the erotic content and the relationship drama than usual for the genre, and although Cait feels that “if you like the genre you will probably like it,” she also concludes that this slightly more sober approach may also make it a good gateway into the genre if you're not already an aficionado, but willing to give it a try.
____________________________________________
Editor, The Future Fire http://futurefire.net/

Offline Djibril

  • Thaumaturge
  • ***
  • Posts: 347
    • View Profile
    • The Future Fire
Re: TFF Reviews
« Reply #43 on: July 28, 2016, 10:40:28 PM »
Valeria Vitale reviews Aliya Whiteley’s Skein Island from Dog Horn Publishing, a supernatural mystery novel that combines the investigation of uncommon events with the investigation of the characters’ feelings and motivations, but perhaps mostly about the power of stories, and how they shape our lives and our perception of the world…
____________________________________________
Editor, The Future Fire http://futurefire.net/

Offline Djibril

  • Thaumaturge
  • ***
  • Posts: 347
    • View Profile
    • The Future Fire
Re: TFF Reviews
« Reply #44 on: August 03, 2016, 09:41:52 PM »
Cait Coker reviews Margrét Helgadóttir and Jo Thomas's edited anthology African Monsters from Fox Spirit books, BFA nominee and a very strong collection told through the dual lenses of horror and dark fantasy. Cait considered this to be “something of an exploratory volume: readers will get the most out of it if they go in wanting something different, rather than just a preconceived idea of genre or of monsters themselves.”
____________________________________________
Editor, The Future Fire http://futurefire.net/