Author Topic: TFF Reviews  (Read 27316 times)

Offline Djibril

  • Thaumaturge
  • ***
  • Posts: 370
    • View Profile
    • The Future Fire
Re: TFF Reviews
« Reply #45 on: August 11, 2016, 03:25:25 pm »
Djibril reviews L.S. Johnson’s Vacui Magia: Stories, self-published in her Traversing Z Press, a high quality collection of mostly horror reprints from great venues such as Crossed Genres Magazine, Strange Horizons and Interzone. I was impressed from the start by the grim, uncompromising, unromantic darkness of these fantasy tales, often pitting a woman protagonist against a cold, ugly, unfair world, in which magic may be a respite or rescue, but more often is just another layer of ugliness and oppression to be survived. Like the best of horror and fantasy writing, the terrors and monsters and atrocities that we suffer teach us about ourselves; they are a form of catharsis, an imagined violent response to injustice that better enables us to stand up and respond forcefully, unflinchingly (if hopefully less viciously) against injustice and suffering. Johnson’s Vacui Magia is a book that never goes quietly, and it is wonderful for it.
____________________________________________
Editor, The Future Fire http://futurefire.net/

Offline Djibril

  • Thaumaturge
  • ***
  • Posts: 370
    • View Profile
    • The Future Fire
Re: TFF Reviews
« Reply #46 on: August 22, 2016, 12:15:02 am »
Wendy Bousfield reviews Margrét Helgadóttir’s edited Winter Tales, an anthology of cold-themed horror fiction from acclaimed Fox Spirit Books. Wendy had a certain amount of criticism for the anthology as a whole, but had very good things to say about outstanding stories by G. H. Finn and Masimba Musodza, which will stay with her long after reading.
« Last Edit: August 24, 2016, 11:38:03 pm by Djibril »
____________________________________________
Editor, The Future Fire http://futurefire.net/

Offline Djibril

  • Thaumaturge
  • ***
  • Posts: 370
    • View Profile
    • The Future Fire
Re: TFF Reviews
« Reply #47 on: August 25, 2016, 12:24:40 am »
Cait Coker reviews Brian Hastings’s Song of the Deep from Sterling Children’s Books, an illustrated chapter book for younger readers and a tie-in to the video game of the same name (which stands alone, however). A surprisingly deep fairy tale about family, the lingering effects of war, and ecology, which Cait found thoughtful, and much of which will resonate long after the first reading.
____________________________________________
Editor, The Future Fire http://futurefire.net/

Offline Djibril

  • Thaumaturge
  • ***
  • Posts: 370
    • View Profile
    • The Future Fire
Re: TFF Reviews
« Reply #48 on: September 02, 2016, 12:14:49 am »
Djibril reviews N.A. Ratnayake’s Red Soil Through Our Fingers, a gripping, powerful and sympathetic novel of Mars colonization and megacorp exploitation, informed by deep understanding of and research into both engineering and geopolitics, and populated with sometimes likeable, usually believable characters. It is a rather short novel, but while I felt that the setting, personae and intrigue would easily have supported a much longer outing, there was no need to pad things any further, and a reader doesn’t feel short-changed. There will be sequels.
____________________________________________
Editor, The Future Fire http://futurefire.net/

Offline Djibril

  • Thaumaturge
  • ***
  • Posts: 370
    • View Profile
    • The Future Fire
Re: TFF Reviews
« Reply #49 on: September 08, 2016, 05:48:29 pm »
Cait Coker reviews Vanessa Fogg’s The Lilies of Dawn, a wonderful fantasy novella that is “exactly the right size for the story that it wants to tell, a deliciously atmospheric tale that blends fairy tale and fantasy.” Cait admires Vanessa’s ability to take a dire dilemma and submit it to the reader “without rendering it utterly bleak, and indeed, leaving something like hope. This is no small feat; far from it. Fogg is an incredible writer,” [we agree] “and I look forward to more of her work.”
____________________________________________
Editor, The Future Fire http://futurefire.net/

Offline Djibril

  • Thaumaturge
  • ***
  • Posts: 370
    • View Profile
    • The Future Fire
Re: TFF Reviews
« Reply #50 on: September 15, 2016, 11:11:46 pm »
Małgorzata Mika reviews Andrew Hook’s punkPunk! from Dog Horn Publishing, which came out last year. An anthology that simultaneously eschews nostalgia, and relies on the remembered Zeitgeist of the 1970s, it may not have been entirely to Małgorzata’s taste, but she concludes that “fervent punk devotees will surely find value in the publication” if they use a combination of punk nostalgia and ideology, and the tenacity to cherish the gems in the volume such as Thompson’s and Palmer’s speculative and experimental stories.
____________________________________________
Editor, The Future Fire http://futurefire.net/

Offline Djibril

  • Thaumaturge
  • ***
  • Posts: 370
    • View Profile
    • The Future Fire
Re: TFF Reviews
« Reply #51 on: September 22, 2016, 11:15:40 pm »
Cait Coker reviews Karen Vaughn’s A Kiss for a Dead Film Star and Other Stories, a short story collection that treats “the seeming inextricability of the forces of love and death, of eros and thanatos.” Cait loved almost every piece, although none of them were easy to read, and her review sums up a collection of stories that is “much heavier than this slight volume should allow, and each of them packs an emotional punch.”

I think I'll track this one down as well…
____________________________________________
Editor, The Future Fire http://futurefire.net/

Offline Djibril

  • Thaumaturge
  • ***
  • Posts: 370
    • View Profile
    • The Future Fire
Re: TFF Reviews
« Reply #52 on: September 29, 2016, 09:38:54 pm »
Don Riggs reviews Patrick Hemstreet’s The God Wave, a new novel from HarperVoyager, in the vein of golden age SF, that reminded Don of Asimov and company “both in positive and negative ways.” Despite some stylistic clunkiness (a lot of tell over show), he concludes by recommending this “rapidly moving, plot-driven novel with an underlying thematic focus on issues that are already significant in our increasingly technologized culture.”
____________________________________________
Editor, The Future Fire http://futurefire.net/

Offline Djibril

  • Thaumaturge
  • ***
  • Posts: 370
    • View Profile
    • The Future Fire
Re: TFF Reviews
« Reply #53 on: October 06, 2016, 02:23:22 pm »
Rachel Verkade reviews Rhonda Parrish's Sirens, an anthology published by World Weaver Press that collects stories of the mythical Sirens, who appear in versions that "run the gamut from benign to malicious, monstrous to elegant." Rachel was impressed by the strength of all stories in this anthology, even the weakest of which were "well-written, fun to read, and contained some intriguing ideas." Other monster-themed anthologies to follow.
____________________________________________
Editor, The Future Fire http://futurefire.net/

Offline Djibril

  • Thaumaturge
  • ***
  • Posts: 370
    • View Profile
    • The Future Fire
Re: TFF Reviews
« Reply #54 on: October 24, 2016, 10:38:52 pm »
Djibril reviews Cirsova: Heroic Fantasy and Science Fiction Magazine #2, a rather retro offering of adventure fantasy and raygun romance with stories ranging from entertaining and mainly perfectly competent to a bit shoddy or in the worst case frankly offensive. If this is the sort of thing you like, I'm sure you'll like this; if it isn't, it'll remind you why you don't! Well produced and serious magazine, with some nice variety in length and medium as well (a mini RPG scenario closes out the issue).
____________________________________________
Editor, The Future Fire http://futurefire.net/

Offline Djibril

  • Thaumaturge
  • ***
  • Posts: 370
    • View Profile
    • The Future Fire
Re: TFF Reviews
« Reply #55 on: October 30, 2016, 05:26:43 pm »
Andy Sawyer reviews Alvaro Zinos-Amaro, Traveler of Worlds: Conversations With Robert Silverberg, a collection of interviews, conversations, recollections and musings that reminds Andy that we should all have read more of this prolific author's positively industrial output. “We might all benefit from his observations, and we certainly benefit from his fiction,” Andy concludes. “It’s good of Alvaro Zinos-Amaro to show us why.”
____________________________________________
Editor, The Future Fire http://futurefire.net/

Offline Djibril

  • Thaumaturge
  • ***
  • Posts: 370
    • View Profile
    • The Future Fire
Re: TFF Reviews
« Reply #56 on: November 13, 2016, 08:03:40 pm »
Małgorzata Mika reviews Kelly Ann Jacobson’s Dear Robot: An Anthology of Epistolary Science Fiction, a collection of diverse, sometimes amusing, sometimes transformative stories that “forge a unique bond with readers” through “insightful probing of characters.” Małgorzata recommends these stories whether you want to be entertained, to admire style and form, or to be improved…
____________________________________________
Editor, The Future Fire http://futurefire.net/

Offline Djibril

  • Thaumaturge
  • ***
  • Posts: 370
    • View Profile
    • The Future Fire
Re: TFF Reviews
« Reply #57 on: November 16, 2016, 11:31:03 pm »
Rachel Verkade reviews Michael Scott and Melanie Ruth Rose's Mirror Image from Tor, a fairly classic horror novel about a haunted mirror and the greedy antique dealer who unwittingly unleashes it on the world. Rachel had some issues with characterisation (especially of women), but ultimately this was “a good, fun, quick read, but don’t expect anything of real substance.”
____________________________________________
Editor, The Future Fire http://futurefire.net/

Offline Djibril

  • Thaumaturge
  • ***
  • Posts: 370
    • View Profile
    • The Future Fire
Re: TFF Reviews
« Reply #58 on: November 23, 2016, 09:42:03 pm »
Cait Coker reviews Cherie Priest’s The Family Plot from Tor, a perfectly spooky ghost story, “both for people who love ghost stories and for those who may be more reluctant to try the genre.” Cait observes that Priest is underrated as a prose stylist, and this novel captures the Southern Gothic sensibility beautifully.
____________________________________________
Editor, The Future Fire http://futurefire.net/

Offline Djibril

  • Thaumaturge
  • ***
  • Posts: 370
    • View Profile
    • The Future Fire
Re: TFF Reviews
« Reply #59 on: January 15, 2017, 05:22:24 pm »
Rachel Verkade reviews Alison Littlewood’s The Hidden People from Jo Fletcher Books, and reports that this is a tightly plotted and crafted horror mystery, written with masterful pastiche of Victorian language and mentality, red herrings and twist ending, combing to a rich and intriguing story.
____________________________________________
Editor, The Future Fire http://futurefire.net/