Margaret Atwood and SF

Margaret Atwood has been known to try to distance her science fiction from the rest of the science fiction field. Intriguingly, she has a book due this autumn called In Other Worlds: Science Fiction and the Human Imagination (published by Random House). The RH website says that this is an “account of her rela’tionship with the literary form we have come to know as science fiction. This relationship has been lifelong, stretch’ing from her days as a child reader in the 1940s through her time as a graduate student at Harvard, where she explored the Victorian ancestors of the form, and continuing with her work as a writer and reviewer.”

Margaret Atwood has been known to try to distance her science fiction from the rest of the science fiction field. Intriguingly, she has a book due this autumn called In Other Worlds: Science Fiction and the Human Imagination (published by Random House). The RH website says that this is an “account of her rela’tionship with the literary form we have come to know as science fiction. This relationship has been lifelong, stretch’ing from her days as a child reader in the 1940s through her time as a graduate student at Harvard, where she explored the Victorian ancestors of the form, and continuing with her work as a writer and reviewer.”