Dark Creed, Anthony Reynolds

Review by Steve Dean

Dark CreedApostle Marduk of the Word Bearers finds a device in a necron tomb. To cut a long story short he switches it on while attacking a warp gate held by the Imperial forces. The gate closes and the planet and its surrounds are cut off from vital re-enforcements. The forces of Chaos then begin to slaughter the populace in order to take over the gate and penetrate all the way to Earth. Everything is going great until a third party arrives in the form of the necrons, undying metal men with some pretty nasty weapons. This is no surprise because it tells us on the back cover.

The book is well written, but the main protagonist is a Chaos warped creature bent on a-slaughterin’ and a-mutatin’ his way across the galaxy. There’s no identifying with such a character, and certainly no sympathy, so at least half of the book doesn’t work. The parts of the book told from the ‘good guys’ perspective work a lot better and are well worth reading.

I can see what the author was trying to do, but a shift of emphasis would have made this an excellent read, instead of merely good.

Dark Creed, Anthony Reynolds, The Black Library, £6.99.

About Stephen Theaker (306 Articles)
Stephen Theaker's reviews, interviews and articles have appeared in Interzone, Black Static, Prism and the BFS Journal. Among other work for the BFS, he has been awards administrator, short story competition administrator, Dark Horizons editor, FantasyCon secretary and treasurer, and (briefly) chair.