Destiny’s Star by Beth Vaughan — book review

Destiny’s Star by Beth Vaughan. Gollancz ‘7.99

Reviewed by R A Bardy [@mangozoid]

Destiny’s Star tells the tale of Bethral and Ezren ‘ a world-weary hardened female warrior and a sickly shrivelled storyteller ‘ and tells of their seemingly forlorn love for each other. Neither of them believes they’re good enough for the other, and the story meanders along quite merrily making unsubtle references throughout. The spanner in the works comes from Ezren the storyteller, for he is a man unfortunately possessed of a powerful fiery wild magic he has no proper control over, at least not until late on in the book. ‘Twould seem, however, that this magic belongs to the people of the Plains and the fearsome Warrior-Priests thereof want it back, at any cost, including the sacrifice of  Ezren himself. And so the story begins, with unquenched love forming the backdrop of a quite boring quest from point A to point B and back again…

Whilst Beth’s world-building technique is good, the plotline in Destiny’s Star is obvious. In consequence, though the last fifty or so pages shot by very quickly, the journey itself was rather plodding. This is the third book in the cycle, though the blurb does not mention this. Unless you’re a devoted fan of Beth’s previous work, I would not recommend starting here.

Destiny’s Star by Beth Vaughan. Gollancz ‘7.99

Reviewed by R A Bardy [@mangozoid]

Destiny’s Star tells the tale of Bethral and Ezren ‘ a world-weary hardened female warrior and a sickly shrivelled storyteller ‘ and tells of their seemingly forlorn love for each other. Neither of them believes they’re good enough for the other, and the story meanders along quite merrily making unsubtle references throughout. The spanner in the works comes from Ezren the storyteller, for he is a man unfortunately possessed of a powerful fiery wild magic he has no proper control over, at least not until late on in the book. ‘Twould seem, however, that this magic belongs to the people of the Plains and the fearsome Warrior-Priests thereof want it back, at any cost, including the sacrifice of  Ezren himself. And so the story begins, with unquenched love forming the backdrop of a quite boring quest from point A to point B and back again…

Whilst Beth’s world-building technique is good, the plotline in Destiny’s Star is obvious. In consequence, though the last fifty or so pages shot by very quickly, the journey itself was rather plodding. This is the third book in the cycle, though the blurb does not mention this. Unless you’re a devoted fan of Beth’s previous work, I would not recommend starting here.