Dog Blood by David Moody. Book review

Dog Blood by David Moody. Gollancz (2010) ‘7.99

Reviewed by Matthew Johns

Reading the back cover, one could be forgiven for thinking that this book sounds very like the film 28 Days Later. ‘ the concept of the world being torn into two factions by an unknown event or catalyst into the Unchanged (normal people) and the Haters (people suddenly imbued with an overriding urge to kill the Unchanged).

Moody’s novels differ from the standard zombie apocalypse fare by making the Haters more than just mindless killing machines. One of the main protagonists in this book, Danny McCoyne, is a Hater. Having had his entire world fall apart, he decides that he wants to go and find the only thing in the world that matters to him: his five-year-old daughter, who is also a Hater.

The other central character is Mark Tillotsen; one of the Unchanged. Tillotsen shares a single hotel room with his wife, his sister and his wife’s parents in a city that has become a heavily guarded refugee camp.

Moody has very cleverly taken what has become a standard horror/thriller genre, and made it his own by making the reader empathise with some of the Haters. His prose flows well, and he avoids many of the clich’s that abound throughout this genre. The characters are believable, and this reviewer couldn’t put it down. If you enjoyed 28 Days Later or I Am Legend, then pick up one of Moody’s books.

Dog Blood by David Moody. Gollancz (2010) ‘7.99

Reviewed by Matthew Johns

Reading the back cover, one could be forgiven for thinking that this book sounds very like the film 28 Days Later. ‘ the concept of the world being torn into two factions by an unknown event or catalyst into the Unchanged (normal people) and the Haters (people suddenly imbued with an overriding urge to kill the Unchanged).

Moody’s novels differ from the standard zombie apocalypse fare by making the Haters more than just mindless killing machines. One of the main protagonists in this book, Danny McCoyne, is a Hater. Having had his entire world fall apart, he decides that he wants to go and find the only thing in the world that matters to him: his five-year-old daughter, who is also a Hater.

The other central character is Mark Tillotsen; one of the Unchanged. Tillotsen shares a single hotel room with his wife, his sister and his wife’s parents in a city that has become a heavily guarded refugee camp.

Moody has very cleverly taken what has become a standard horror/thriller genre, and made it his own by making the reader empathise with some of the Haters. His prose flows well, and he avoids many of the clich’s that abound throughout this genre. The characters are believable, and this reviewer couldn’t put it down. If you enjoyed 28 Days Later or I Am Legend, then pick up one of Moody’s books.