Moondance of Stonewylde by Kit Berry — book review

Moondance of Stonewylde by Kit Berry. Gollancz ‘7.99

Reviewed By Carl Barker

The Stonewylde series of books are best described as a pleasant slowburner of a tale, set in a fictional modern-day community hidden deep in the heart of Dorset. Originally self-published as a trilogy, the series has now been picked up by Orion/ Gollancz, with a further two books to come in the series over the next year or so.

This second book in the original trilogy continues the journey of young Yul and Sylvie as their attraction for each other grows beneath the malevolent gaze of the community’s leader, Magus, who intends to exploit Sylvie’s unique magical talents for his own ends.

The characters are well-written with the whole community given chance to breath throughout the story without detracting from the main story arc. The main players, though perhaps lacking a little in complexity at times, nevertheless remain true to their particular ethos throughout and Magus in particular is a character who draws a direct sense of moral outrage from the reader via his callous regard for others within his community.

The ending leaves many questions unanswered and though able to be enjoyed as a standalone book, this evidently works better as part of a greater whole and readers would be advised to visit the first book in the series beforehand in order to gain a better understanding of Stonewylde.

Moondance of Stonewylde by Kit Berry. Gollancz ‘7.99

Reviewed By Carl Barker

The Stonewylde series of books are best described as a pleasant slowburner of a tale, set in a fictional modern-day community hidden deep in the heart of Dorset. Originally self-published as a trilogy, the series has now been picked up by Orion/ Gollancz, with a further two books to come in the series over the next year or so.

This second book in the original trilogy continues the journey of young Yul and Sylvie as their attraction for each other grows beneath the malevolent gaze of the community’s leader, Magus, who intends to exploit Sylvie’s unique magical talents for his own ends.

The characters are well-written with the whole community given chance to breath throughout the story without detracting from the main story arc. The main players, though perhaps lacking a little in complexity at times, nevertheless remain true to their particular ethos throughout and Magus in particular is a character who draws a direct sense of moral outrage from the reader via his callous regard for others within his community.

The ending leaves many questions unanswered and though able to be enjoyed as a standalone book, this evidently works better as part of a greater whole and readers would be advised to visit the first book in the series beforehand in order to gain a better understanding of Stonewylde.