Mutant City. Book Review

mutant_cityMUTANT CITY by Steve Feasey
Bloomsbury Publishing, p/b, 368pp, £6.99
Reviewed by Matthew Johns

Mutant City may seem slightly familiar to some readers, with shades of 2000AD and Mad Max mixed with the recent Matt Damon movie Elysium.  Years after a catastrophic world event, humans have emerged from their shelters, and now live in cities where every aspect of their life can be controlled, and reproduction no longer needs a physical act between a man and a woman – foetuses are grown according to parents’ requirements.  Outside of these seemingly perfect cities, mutants live in ghettos, increasingly demanding rights for themselves instead of being second-class citizens.

Unknown to the general populace, experiments have been carried out on foetuses to produce mutants with special abilities, but the resulting mutants were taken away by activists and raised in hiding.  13 years on, these mutants’ powers are beginning to emerge, and they find themselves being drawn together.

While from a casual glance this book may appear to be very similar to other works, don’t be deceived – Feasey’s work is compelling, enticing the reader further into his well-crafted world.

About Phil Lunt (800 Articles)
Hailing from the rain-sodden, North Western wastelands of England, Phil has dabbled in many an arcane vocation. From rock-star to conveyor-belt scraper at a bread factory, 'Dairy Logistics Technician' to world's worst waiter. He's currently a freelance designer, actor, sometime writer/editor and Chair of the British Fantasy Society. He is on the Global Frequency and is still considering becoming an astronaut when he grows up.