Outpost by Adam Baker. Book review

Outpost by Adam Baker. Hodder & Stoughton (2011) ‘12.99

Reviewed by Colin Leslie

Does the world need yet another post-apocalyptic zombie thriller? Adam Baker thinks so, and has delivered one, with his first novel Outpost. The Crew of the Kasker Rampart refinery are stuck in the arctic waiting for supplies when they realise things may not be going well back home. It becomes apparent that there has been an event (a global pandemic) and it’s clear they are on their own. They set about planning their escape by exploring the surrounding snowy wastes. Then, when they come into contact with other refugees from the catastrophe, it becomes a fight for survival.

Okay, this isn’t a zombie novel but those remaining act like zombies, so let’s not be pedantic. This is a post apocalyptic novel, even though the true nature of the event is never revealed, and the oil platform, and sense of confusion, is reminiscent of the start of Conrad William’s One.

While ramping up the tension and confusion, Adam Baker also ramps up the action and despite the limited canvas of the Arctic landscape, manages to devise an impressive variety of situations for the characters. The characters are perhaps the strongest feature of the book. From Jane, the faithless and suicidal vicar, to Punch, the laid back and heroic chef, there is a wide range of conflicting personalities.

There are some interesting themes lurking in the background with Jane’s loss of faith, the contrast between the castle-like oil refinery and the sweeping panorama of the Arctic, as well as an ecological undercurrent. These backdrops are all kept low key allowing the pace to be maintained with plenty of short snappy action scenes. Outpost manages to satisfy with its mix of well drawn characters and action to deliver an interesting take on an overused genre.

Outpost by Adam Baker. Hodder & Stoughton (2011) ‘12.99

Reviewed by Colin Leslie

Does the world need yet another post-apocalyptic zombie thriller? Adam Baker thinks so, and has delivered one, with his first novel Outpost. The Crew of the Kasker Rampart refinery are stuck in the arctic waiting for supplies when they realise things may not be going well back home. It becomes apparent that there has been an event (a global pandemic) and it’s clear they are on their own. They set about planning their escape by exploring the surrounding snowy wastes. Then, when they come into contact with other refugees from the catastrophe, it becomes a fight for survival.

Okay, this isn’t a zombie novel but those remaining act like zombies, so let’s not be pedantic. This is a post apocalyptic novel, even though the true nature of the event is never revealed, and the oil platform, and sense of confusion, is reminiscent of the start of Conrad William’s One.

While ramping up the tension and confusion, Adam Baker also ramps up the action and despite the limited canvas of the Arctic landscape, manages to devise an impressive variety of situations for the characters. The characters are perhaps the strongest feature of the book. From Jane, the faithless and suicidal vicar, to Punch, the laid back and heroic chef, there is a wide range of conflicting personalities.

There are some interesting themes lurking in the background with Jane’s loss of faith, the contrast between the castle-like oil refinery and the sweeping panorama of the Arctic, as well as an ecological undercurrent. These backdrops are all kept low key allowing the pace to be maintained with plenty of short snappy action scenes. Outpost manages to satisfy with its mix of well drawn characters and action to deliver an interesting take on an overused genre.