The Bride that Time Forgot by Paul Magrs. Book review

The Bride That Time Forgot by Paul Magrs. Headline (2011) ‘7.99

Reviewed by Jan Edwards

This is the fifth book about Brenda: famous Whitby landlady, and original bride of Frankenstein’s monster.

Those already familiar with Brenda and will recognise many of the characters that have come to Whitby for a jolly, slaying, Christmas celebration. There is Brenda’s old friend, the vampire slaying Professor Henry Cleavis; we have Brenda’s best pal, Effie, who has new live-in lover, none other than the suave and creepy Kristoff Alucard. We have Robert the gay hotel manager who has a new, green-tinged, boyfriend names Gila, who is the indentured man-servant to Marjorie Staynes, who is in turn owner of the new bookshop and founder of a cult dedicated to mysterious Victorian SF writer Beatrice Mapp. And lastly there is Penny, who has joined the cult and is in danger of being sucked into a parallel universe.

I suspect newcomers might be a touch confused as some of the plot lines and sub-characters, such as the evil Mrs Claus, but I am not sure it matters over much. This is pure fun and understanding plots and keeping track of characters is really not all that important. The Bride That Time Forgot wreaks havoc across the entire gamut of fantasy tropes, and a passing game ‘spot the Victorian and Edwardian Literature Heroes’, whilst reading adds a further dimension, as you try to recall where and when this name and that plot originated.

Those who have read previous books, or heard the radio plays, about Brenda and the rest of the Whitby gang will adore this new romp. Newcomers are in for a treat because The Bride That Time Forgot is a slice of sheer unadulterated silliness that is very hard to resist.

The Bride That Time Forgot by Paul Magrs. Headline (2011) ‘7.99

Reviewed by Jan Edwards

This is the fifth book about Brenda: famous Whitby landlady, and original bride of Frankenstein’s monster.

Those already familiar with Brenda and will recognise many of the characters that have come to Whitby for a jolly, slaying, Christmas celebration. There is Brenda’s old friend, the vampire slaying Professor Henry Cleavis; we have Brenda’s best pal, Effie, who has new live-in lover, none other than the suave and creepy Kristoff Alucard. We have Robert the gay hotel manager who has a new, green-tinged, boyfriend names Gila, who is the indentured man-servant to Marjorie Staynes, who is in turn owner of the new bookshop and founder of a cult dedicated to mysterious Victorian SF writer Beatrice Mapp. And lastly there is Penny, who has joined the cult and is in danger of being sucked into a parallel universe.

I suspect newcomers might be a touch confused as some of the plot lines and sub-characters, such as the evil Mrs Claus, but I am not sure it matters over much. This is pure fun and understanding plots and keeping track of characters is really not all that important. The Bride That Time Forgot wreaks havoc across the entire gamut of fantasy tropes, and a passing game ‘spot the Victorian and Edwardian Literature Heroes’, whilst reading adds a further dimension, as you try to recall where and when this name and that plot originated.

Those who have read previous books, or heard the radio plays, about Brenda and the rest of the Whitby gang will adore this new romp. Newcomers are in for a treat because The Bride That Time Forgot is a slice of sheer unadulterated silliness that is very hard to resist.