The Mammoth Book of Dracula edited by Stephen Jones. Book review

The Mammoth Book of Dracula edited by Stephen Jones. Robinson ‘7.99

Reviewed by Jenny Barber

There is a certain genius to the underlying concept of The MBO Dracula (originally published in 1997 as The Mammoth Book of Dracula: Vampire Tales for the New Millennium) ‘ where you get to follow Dracula through the centuries and experience a jawdropping range of adventures covering a fascinating variety of styles. Here you’ll find stories that are creepy, moving, disturbing, funny, gory and, in a couple of cases, both incomprehensible and hard-going.

There’s the classic Where Greek meets Greek by Basil Copper, with its enchanting story of a gentlemen who becomes enamoured with the mysterious woman he meets on holiday and discovers, inevitably, that there is far more to her and her aged companion than previously expected. Or for Kim Newman fans, there’s the excellent Coppola’s Dracula ‘ set in the Anno Dracula ‘verse, which tells of the making of a Dracula movie (filmed, of course, in Transylvania) and is chock full of nefarious doings and an intriguing vampire lady whose charitable impulses get her into trouble.

On the lighter side, there’s some delicious humour to be found in Nancy Holder’s Blood Freak and Jan Edwards’ A Taste of Culture. The latter is a short and very funny account of Dracula out choosing a takeaway while the former brings Dracula into the sphere of Timothy Leary with some mind-bending results.

In The Last Testament by Brian Hodge, Dracula not only becomes pope but also has a remarkable meeting with his maker. This one is quite genius. The habit of meeting notable people continues in Daddy’s Little Girl by Mandy Slater, where this time it’s Dracula’s daughter who has an interesting encounter with Aleister Crowley and must deal with her father’s response to her actions.

Other stories include forays into insanity and home-care, thwarted Nazis and unfortunately placed construction projects. All in all, The MBO Dracula is an enjoyable read with plenty to suck you in (I know, sorry!).

The Mammoth Book of Dracula edited by Stephen Jones. Robinson ‘7.99

Reviewed by Jenny Barber

There is a certain genius to the underlying concept of The MBO Dracula (originally published in 1997 as The Mammoth Book of Dracula: Vampire Tales for the New Millennium) ‘ where you get to follow Dracula through the centuries and experience a jawdropping range of adventures covering a fascinating variety of styles. Here you’ll find stories that are creepy, moving, disturbing, funny, gory and, in a couple of cases, both incomprehensible and hard-going.

There’s the classic Where Greek meets Greek by Basil Copper, with its enchanting story of a gentlemen who becomes enamoured with the mysterious woman he meets on holiday and discovers, inevitably, that there is far more to her and her aged companion than previously expected. Or for Kim Newman fans, there’s the excellent Coppola’s Dracula ‘ set in the Anno Dracula ‘verse, which tells of the making of a Dracula movie (filmed, of course, in Transylvania) and is chock full of nefarious doings and an intriguing vampire lady whose charitable impulses get her into trouble.

On the lighter side, there’s some delicious humour to be found in Nancy Holder’s Blood Freak and Jan Edwards’ A Taste of Culture. The latter is a short and very funny account of Dracula out choosing a takeaway while the former brings Dracula into the sphere of Timothy Leary with some mind-bending results.

In The Last Testament by Brian Hodge, Dracula not only becomes pope but also has a remarkable meeting with his maker. This one is quite genius. The habit of meeting notable people continues in Daddy’s Little Girl by Mandy Slater, where this time it’s Dracula’s daughter who has an interesting encounter with Aleister Crowley and must deal with her father’s response to her actions.

Other stories include forays into insanity and home-care, thwarted Nazis and unfortunately placed construction projects. All in all, The MBO Dracula is an enjoyable read with plenty to suck you in (I know, sorry!).