The Unwise Woman of Fuggis Mire by Raven Dane. Book review

The Unwise Woman of Fuggis Mire by Raven Dane. Prosochi ‘11.99

Reviewed by Matt Johns

A new(ish) entry to the comedy fantasy genre, Dane’s book contains some great parodies of classic novels and films. Her world is populated by many well-known fantasy species ‘ elves, demons, dwarves, boggarts and heavy metal-loving flower fairies.

The titular Unwise Woman of Fuggis Mire is Morven, purveyor of rather unusual potions, poultices, cures and advice to those who seek her out. Morven takes the mantle of Unwise Woman for many reasons ‘ her advice is often far from wise: her own personal life shows just how unwise she is. Madly in love with the dashing, promiscuous, steals-anything-that-isn’t-tied-down and sleeps-with-anything-female-and-still-breathing highwayman, Jed Moonraven, she lives in a swamp beset by questing fellowships and apprentices seeking their hidden destinies (of which there are many) in between short-lived but passionate trysts with her beloved.

Dane is clearly a devotee of high fantasy such as Tolkien, and her work resounds with fond parodies of the many characters and scenarios that often appear in such novels. Many witty situations, Carry On-style smutty humour and fantasy in-jokes arise throughout the book, making it overall an excellent read. Comedy fantasy authors always end up with the inevitable comparison to Pratchett, which while undoubtedly flattering is unfair ‘ Dane deserves to be judged on her own, substantial merits.

The Unwise Woman of Fuggis Mire by Raven Dane. Prosochi ‘11.99

Reviewed by Matt Johns

A new(ish) entry to the comedy fantasy genre, Dane’s book contains some great parodies of classic novels and films. Her world is populated by many well-known fantasy species ‘ elves, demons, dwarves, boggarts and heavy metal-loving flower fairies.

The titular Unwise Woman of Fuggis Mire is Morven, purveyor of rather unusual potions, poultices, cures and advice to those who seek her out. Morven takes the mantle of Unwise Woman for many reasons ‘ her advice is often far from wise: her own personal life shows just how unwise she is. Madly in love with the dashing, promiscuous, steals-anything-that-isn’t-tied-down and sleeps-with-anything-female-and-still-breathing highwayman, Jed Moonraven, she lives in a swamp beset by questing fellowships and apprentices seeking their hidden destinies (of which there are many) in between short-lived but passionate trysts with her beloved.

Dane is clearly a devotee of high fantasy such as Tolkien, and her work resounds with fond parodies of the many characters and scenarios that often appear in such novels. Many witty situations, Carry On-style smutty humour and fantasy in-jokes arise throughout the book, making it overall an excellent read. Comedy fantasy authors always end up with the inevitable comparison to Pratchett, which while undoubtedly flattering is unfair ‘ Dane deserves to be judged on her own, substantial merits.