The Watchers by John Steele. Book review

The Watchers by John Steele. Bantam Press ‘12.99

Reviewed by Jim McLeod

Jay Harper is on the trail of a missing Olympic athlete. Arriving in Switzerland, he meets the attractive but aloof Katherine in a hotel bar. She’s a high class hooker who can’t believe her luck ‘ but not all luck is good.

Marc Rochat spends his time in a belfry talking to statues, his cat and some ghosts.  He has to watch over the town of Lausanne, looking for the angel his mother told him he’d have to save. Believing that Katherine is the one, he thinks his moment has come ‘ but not all moments are good. As angels go to war over the fate of mankind.

John Steele has certainly come out with all guns blazing for his debut novel. You can tell that he was an award winning cameraman as the book has a number of beautifully described passages which allow you to picture the scene as clearly as if you were watching it on the screen.

You could describe this as a take on Gaiman’s Neverwhere. However, this would do both novels a disservice. Yes, there are some similarities but there is enough of a unique voice to the novel to lay to rest these comparisons. As with many first novels, there could have been a more liberal use of editing as the narrative does get bogged down at times with a few over descriptive passages that do play havoc with the pacing. However, this is still a book worthy of your time.

The Watchers by John Steele. Bantam Press ‘12.99

Reviewed by Jim McLeod

Jay Harper is on the trail of a missing Olympic athlete. Arriving in Switzerland, he meets the attractive but aloof Katherine in a hotel bar. She’s a high class hooker who can’t believe her luck ‘ but not all luck is good.

Marc Rochat spends his time in a belfry talking to statues, his cat and some ghosts.  He has to watch over the town of Lausanne, looking for the angel his mother told him he’d have to save. Believing that Katherine is the one, he thinks his moment has come ‘ but not all moments are good. As angels go to war over the fate of mankind.

John Steele has certainly come out with all guns blazing for his debut novel. You can tell that he was an award winning cameraman as the book has a number of beautifully described passages which allow you to picture the scene as clearly as if you were watching it on the screen.

You could describe this as a take on Gaiman’s Neverwhere. However, this would do both novels a disservice. Yes, there are some similarities but there is enough of a unique voice to the novel to lay to rest these comparisons. As with many first novels, there could have been a more liberal use of editing as the narrative does get bogged down at times with a few over descriptive passages that do play havoc with the pacing. However, this is still a book worthy of your time.