Books received from PS Publishing

 

Steve Aylett: Rebel at the End of Time (‘11.99 / ‘24.99) ‘ ’21st-century revolutionary Leo finds himself at the End of Time, surrounded by decadent sorcerers whose childlike incomprehension is his worst nightmare. How to be effective when consequence is removed? What can have meaning when everything is transformed into fashion? Can love exist here? Leo storms through this lurid land in search of meaning, a cause, and a meal he can recognise.’

James Cooper: Terra Damnata (’12 / ’25) ‘ ‘Arthur is well acquainted with the dark. He has hollowed out for himself a life that has become meaningless, his daughter’s death and his gambling debts casting a long shadow, exacting an emotional toll that leaves him desperate. So desperate, he is prepared to consider anything to heal his marriage and mend his broken life.’

Peter Crowther & Nick Gevers (ed): The New and Perfect Man (’30 / ’60) — The latest bumper edition of the Postscripts Anthology – almost 150,000 words in all!

Carol Emshwille: In the Time of War / Master of the Road to Nowhere (‘19.99 / ‘49.99) ‘ ‘In this double-header collection featuring the very best of Carol Emshwiller — with one half of the book featuring stories set in times of relative peace and the other half in war — the author demonstrates how, in the words of the Philadelphia Enquirer, she ‘has never lost her capacity to surprise’.’

Ian R MacLeod: Wake Up and Dream ‘19.99 / ‘49.99 (proof seen; due October 2011) ‘ ‘Hollywood, 1940. It’s the Golden Age of the Feelies. All one-time actor and unlicensed matrimonial private eye Clark Gable has to do is impersonate a wealthy scriptwriter for a few hours, and sign the contract for the biopic of the inventor of a device which has changed entertainment forever. What could go wrong? Already, he’s seeing ghosts ‘ but that’s nothing unusual.’

Rudy Rucker: Nest Scrolls: A Writer’s Life (‘19.99 / ‘49.99) ‘ ” the true life adventures of Rudy Rucker ‘innovative novelist, mathematician, and computer hacker. His career goals? To explore infinity, popularize the fourth dimension, seek the gnarl, write beatnik SF, and father a family.  At one level, Rucker’s genial and unfettered memoir brings us a first-hand account of how he and his fellows ushered in our postmodern world. At another level, Nested Scrolls is the wry and moving tale of a man making his way from one turbulent century to the next.’

Tobias Seamon: The Emperor’s Toy Chest (‘11.99 / ‘24.99) ‘ ‘The Emperor’s Toy Chest explores history, mythology, fantasy, and the magical borderlands between. A modern Odysseus discovers a siren amidst the carnival thrills of the boardwalk, while an overworked vizier confronts the pitfalls of power to the tune of laughing cats; an imprisoned king examines a series of double-edged amusements even as a suburban youth comes of age like a general facing catastrophe on the battlefield.’

 

Steve Aylett: Rebel at the End of Time (‘11.99 / ‘24.99) ‘ ’21st-century revolutionary Leo finds himself at the End of Time, surrounded by decadent sorcerers whose childlike incomprehension is his worst nightmare. How to be effective when consequence is removed? What can have meaning when everything is transformed into fashion? Can love exist here? Leo storms through this lurid land in search of meaning, a cause, and a meal he can recognise.’

James Cooper: Terra Damnata (’12 / ’25) ‘ ‘Arthur is well acquainted with the dark. He has hollowed out for himself a life that has become meaningless, his daughter’s death and his gambling debts casting a long shadow, exacting an emotional toll that leaves him desperate. So desperate, he is prepared to consider anything to heal his marriage and mend his broken life.’

Peter Crowther & Nick Gevers (ed): The New and Perfect Man (’30 / ’60) — The latest bumper edition of the Postscripts Anthology – almost 150,000 words in all!

Carol Emshwille: In the Time of War / Master of the Road to Nowhere (‘19.99 / ‘49.99) ‘ ‘In this double-header collection featuring the very best of Carol Emshwiller — with one half of the book featuring stories set in times of relative peace and the other half in war — the author demonstrates how, in the words of the Philadelphia Enquirer, she ‘has never lost her capacity to surprise’.’

Ian R MacLeod: Wake Up and Dream ‘19.99 / ‘49.99 (proof seen; due October 2011) ‘ ‘Hollywood, 1940. It’s the Golden Age of the Feelies. All one-time actor and unlicensed matrimonial private eye Clark Gable has to do is impersonate a wealthy scriptwriter for a few hours, and sign the contract for the biopic of the inventor of a device which has changed entertainment forever. What could go wrong? Already, he’s seeing ghosts ‘ but that’s nothing unusual.’

Rudy Rucker: Nest Scrolls: A Writer’s Life (‘19.99 / ‘49.99) ‘ ” the true life adventures of Rudy Rucker ‘innovative novelist, mathematician, and computer hacker. His career goals? To explore infinity, popularize the fourth dimension, seek the gnarl, write beatnik SF, and father a family.  At one level, Rucker’s genial and unfettered memoir brings us a first-hand account of how he and his fellows ushered in our postmodern world. At another level, Nested Scrolls is the wry and moving tale of a man making his way from one turbulent century to the next.’

Tobias Seamon: The Emperor’s Toy Chest (‘11.99 / ‘24.99) ‘ ‘The Emperor’s Toy Chest explores history, mythology, fantasy, and the magical borderlands between. A modern Odysseus discovers a siren amidst the carnival thrills of the boardwalk, while an overworked vizier confronts the pitfalls of power to the tune of laughing cats; an imprisoned king examines a series of double-edged amusements even as a suburban youth comes of age like a general facing catastrophe on the battlefield.’