The Ironclad Prophecy by Pat Kelleher — book review

The Ironclad Prophecy by Pat Kelleher. Abaddon Books ‘7.99

Reviewed by Tony Lane

It wasn’t until I started reading this book that I realised it was the second in a series, No Man’s World. The first is Black Hand Gang and I would suggest  reading this, but it is not required to enjoy The Ironclad Prophecy.

There are some books that make it obvious that a lot of research has gone into it; some have an almost obsessional level of detail and feel. Having been to my fair share of military shows and having read on the topic, it is quite obvious that Mr Kelleher has a passion and feel for the British army in World War One.

This book bridges the gap between historical fiction and science fiction in an intriguing way. The Great War and, in particular, the Battle of the Somme are the inspiration; when a whole Battalion of Fusiliers is transported by an occult ritual to a hostile alien world they suddenly wish they were back on the battlefield facing an artillery barrage again.

The world building is detailed and yet does not appear to take up a huge amount of space on the page. The characters are vibrant and believable and make for a thoroughly entertaining read. If you have an interest in military fiction then this will make an interesting change of pace. If you like science fiction too, then this will be a great read.

The Ironclad Prophecy by Pat Kelleher. Abaddon Books ‘7.99

Reviewed by Tony Lane

It wasn’t until I started reading this book that I realised it was the second in a series, No Man’s World. The first is Black Hand Gang and I would suggest  reading this, but it is not required to enjoy The Ironclad Prophecy.

There are some books that make it obvious that a lot of research has gone into it; some have an almost obsessional level of detail and feel. Having been to my fair share of military shows and having read on the topic, it is quite obvious that Mr Kelleher has a passion and feel for the British army in World War One.

This book bridges the gap between historical fiction and science fiction in an intriguing way. The Great War and, in particular, the Battle of the Somme are the inspiration; when a whole Battalion of Fusiliers is transported by an occult ritual to a hostile alien world they suddenly wish they were back on the battlefield facing an artillery barrage again.

The world building is detailed and yet does not appear to take up a huge amount of space on the page. The characters are vibrant and believable and make for a thoroughly entertaining read. If you have an interest in military fiction then this will make an interesting change of pace. If you like science fiction too, then this will be a great read.