The Warlord’s Legacy by Ari Marmell — book review

The Warlord’s Legacy by Ari Marmell. Gollancz ‘7.99

Reviewed by Karen Stevens

Over twenty years ago, Corvis Rebaine trampled a bloodstained path across the land of Imphallion, bringing death and mass destruction in an attempt to forge a greater society.

Now Rebaine is living quietly under an assumed name, trying to achieve change through non-violent means but when Imphallion is invaded and the bickering guilds and nobles are unable to cease their endless squabbling and respond with any unified force, someone, wearing Rebaine’s distinctive black armour and wielding what appears to be his demon forged axe, starts killing again.

The Warlord’s Legacy falls into the branch of heroic/sword and sorcery fantasy. Eschewing the detailed world-building found in epic multi-volume fantasies, it’s an action-packed story studded with nuggets of dark humour ‘ I got the feeling that Ari Marmell had a ball writing this book. It benefits from strong characterisation, and virtually all the characters are morally ambiguous, drawn in varying shades of grey rather than being completely heroic or villainous. There’s nothing outstandingly new or original here, but if you want an enjoyable, fast-moving fantasy, then you could do worse then to check it out.

The Warlord’s Legacy by Ari Marmell. Gollancz ‘7.99

Reviewed by Karen Stevens

Over twenty years ago, Corvis Rebaine trampled a bloodstained path across the land of Imphallion, bringing death and mass destruction in an attempt to forge a greater society.

Now Rebaine is living quietly under an assumed name, trying to achieve change through non-violent means but when Imphallion is invaded and the bickering guilds and nobles are unable to cease their endless squabbling and respond with any unified force, someone, wearing Rebaine’s distinctive black armour and wielding what appears to be his demon forged axe, starts killing again.

The Warlord’s Legacy falls into the branch of heroic/sword and sorcery fantasy. Eschewing the detailed world-building found in epic multi-volume fantasies, it’s an action-packed story studded with nuggets of dark humour ‘ I got the feeling that Ari Marmell had a ball writing this book. It benefits from strong characterisation, and virtually all the characters are morally ambiguous, drawn in varying shades of grey rather than being completely heroic or villainous. There’s nothing outstandingly new or original here, but if you want an enjoyable, fast-moving fantasy, then you could do worse then to check it out.