Witches of the East by Melissa de la Cruz — book review

Witches of the East by Melissa de la Cruz. Sphere ‘6.99

Reviewed by Carl Barker

It’s no good, you know ‘ no matter how hard I try, I just can’t seem to adopt the mindset of a teenage girl and as such, I fear I sit somewhat outside the target audience for this paranormal romance. Nevertheless I shall persevere.

Witch sisters Freya and Ingrid, along with mother Joanna, have lived a peaceful life of seclusion in the quiet town of New Hampton ever since they were forbidden from using their powers by the powers that be. However, after casting a couple of seemingly innocent spells and potions to help their neighbours, the girls soon find that things begin to unravel in New Hampton at a rate of knots, bringing a heady mixture of sex, murder and otherworldly creatures to the fore.

After wading through the usual cavalcade of supernatural beings and errant gods, there’s a distinct sense with this book that less might perhaps have been more with regards to the story. The plot is by all means well padded, but towards the end things become a little hurried with narrative timing all too readily sacrificed in the name of pacing as virtually every paranormal clich’ is hurled into the mix at will, without the necessary space given to working them properly into the story.

If you tend to like your fiction like your cappuccinos ‘ light and frothy with very little substance ‘ then pick this one up, but those who prefer a more substantial read may want to look elsewhere.  

Witches of the East by Melissa de la Cruz. Sphere ‘6.99

Reviewed by Carl Barker

It’s no good, you know ‘ no matter how hard I try, I just can’t seem to adopt the mindset of a teenage girl and as such, I fear I sit somewhat outside the target audience for this paranormal romance. Nevertheless I shall persevere.

Witch sisters Freya and Ingrid, along with mother Joanna, have lived a peaceful life of seclusion in the quiet town of New Hampton ever since they were forbidden from using their powers by the powers that be. However, after casting a couple of seemingly innocent spells and potions to help their neighbours, the girls soon find that things begin to unravel in New Hampton at a rate of knots, bringing a heady mixture of sex, murder and otherworldly creatures to the fore.

After wading through the usual cavalcade of supernatural beings and errant gods, there’s a distinct sense with this book that less might perhaps have been more with regards to the story. The plot is by all means well padded, but towards the end things become a little hurried with narrative timing all too readily sacrificed in the name of pacing as virtually every paranormal clich’ is hurled into the mix at will, without the necessary space given to working them properly into the story.

If you tend to like your fiction like your cappuccinos ‘ light and frothy with very little substance ‘ then pick this one up, but those who prefer a more substantial read may want to look elsewhere.