Dust by Joan Frances Turner. Book Review

DUST by Joan Frances Turner

Penguin, £7.99

Reviewed by Jim Mcleod.

Dust tells the story of Jessie. Jessie was once a vegetarian, now she eats fresh meat. You see, Jessie was killed in a car accident and has now clawed her way back as a zombie. Now a member of the zombie gang the Fly-by-Nights, she roams the dark places where humans fear to tread. These are not your typical mindless shambling zombies: they think, have emotions and live as one. In fact, if it wasn’t for the smell and the pieces of rotten flesh that fall off them, you would think they were still human.

As is wont in these sorts of novels, something appears to threaten the fragile balance between humans and zombie kind. In this case it is a disease that turns its victims into something in between.

The book is well written and the author has created a well developed world, with a plot and narrative that is fast paced and easy to read. The author does a good job of making the zombies sympathetic, even though the zombies themselves are devoid of all sense of emotion. Plus, it is great to see a variation on the tired and overused zombie genre. However I don’t think I was the target audience for this book. I wouldn’t go as far as saying it’s Twilight with zombies, but I do think fans of that book would get a lot more from this. All in all a decent read, just not my cup of tea.

About Phil Lunt (905 Articles)
<p>Hailing from the rain-sodden, North Western wastelands of England, Phil has dabbled in many an arcane vocation. From rock-star to conveyor-belt scraper at a bread factory, ‘Dairy Logistics Technician’ to world’s worst waiter.</p> <p>He’s currently a freelance designer, actor, sometime writer/editor and Chair of the British Fantasy Society. He is on the Global Frequency and is still considering becoming an astronaut when he grows up.</p>