Roil: The Nightbound Land by Trent Jamieson — book review

Roil: The Nightbound Land by Trent Jamieson. Angry Robot ‘7.99

Reviewed by Elloise Hopkins

The land is under constant threat of the storm known as the Roil. It carries with it monsters and vicious infections as it rolls across Shale destroying cities and tearing lives apart. Margaret heads towards the Roil in search of her parents, seeking revenge for the loss of her home and everything she once knew.

David, hunted by the Council Vergers, orphaned and hindered by grief, guilt and the pains of drug dependency, finds himself in the power of the Old Man, Cadell, an ancient and powerful character whose motives are not always clear. Now, as the journey takes him closer to the Roil, David must discover what Cadell’s friendship will cost him.

The tension had me almost yearning for the addictive drug Carnival myself as the story pressed on at a breakneck pace. Jamieson writes well, unhindered by much description, and focuses on tighter details, sketching out the trials and traumas of each character’s journey. My only disappointment is that much of the strange Roil, its origins and intentions, are as yet unexplained in detail and I was left wanting more of a picture at times.

Roil: The Nightbound Land by Trent Jamieson. Angry Robot ‘7.99

Reviewed by Elloise Hopkins

The land is under constant threat of the storm known as the Roil. It carries with it monsters and vicious infections as it rolls across Shale destroying cities and tearing lives apart. Margaret heads towards the Roil in search of her parents, seeking revenge for the loss of her home and everything she once knew.

David, hunted by the Council Vergers, orphaned and hindered by grief, guilt and the pains of drug dependency, finds himself in the power of the Old Man, Cadell, an ancient and powerful character whose motives are not always clear. Now, as the journey takes him closer to the Roil, David must discover what Cadell’s friendship will cost him.

The tension had me almost yearning for the addictive drug Carnival myself as the story pressed on at a breakneck pace. Jamieson writes well, unhindered by much description, and focuses on tighter details, sketching out the trials and traumas of each character’s journey. My only disappointment is that much of the strange Roil, its origins and intentions, are as yet unexplained in detail and I was left wanting more of a picture at times.