The A-Men Return by John Trevillian — book review

The A-Men Return by John Trevillian. Troubador ‘18.99

Reviewed by Ian Hunter

Continuity jingle here and voiceover; ‘Previously in A-Men: Jack woke up with no memory of who he was, only a book of folk tales to guide him, and he quickly found himself on the run with other renegades who formed the A-Men, and crossed paths with the mysterious Dr. Nathaniel Glass, and strange goings-on beneath Phoenix Tower in a world where the rich have left a decaying Earth behind and gone off into space.’ End of voiceover.

The A-Men was a fast, furious, funny, read with many horribly memorable scenes and equally memorable characters which told the story in very distinctive voices from the viewpoint of Jack, or the Nowhereman as he is known, as well as Sister Midnight, Pure and Dingo The Wonder Dog and several others. So what of the sequel?

Well, Phoenix Tower is no more, and neither are the A-Men who have for better or worse all gone their separate ways. Dead City is in a poorer state than before. Take all the post-apocalyptical movies and books you have seen and read and cram them together until they reach critical mass and then pick at the deadly radioactive embers and it still won’t add up to the plot of The A-Men Return. And I should have added into that mix an unhealthy dose of computer games and graphic novels. Life in Dead City is barely worth living, but in some space stations not very far away things aren’t much better either as the super rich are succumbing to a virus, and their only hope may be something that is long-forgotten back on earth. Like it says on the tin, cue the return of the A-Men. As with the first book in the series we are treated to something that is vividly dark and savage which lashings of sex and violence and bad words that hurtles along to a climax or sorts that more than nicely sets up Forever A-Men, the final part of the trilogy. Can’t wait.

The A-Men Return by John Trevillian. Troubador ‘18.99

Reviewed by Ian Hunter

Continuity jingle here and voiceover; ‘Previously in A-Men: Jack woke up with no memory of who he was, only a book of folk tales to guide him, and he quickly found himself on the run with other renegades who formed the A-Men, and crossed paths with the mysterious Dr. Nathaniel Glass, and strange goings-on beneath Phoenix Tower in a world where the rich have left a decaying Earth behind and gone off into space.’ End of voiceover.

The A-Men was a fast, furious, funny, read with many horribly memorable scenes and equally memorable characters which told the story in very distinctive voices from the viewpoint of Jack, or the Nowhereman as he is known, as well as Sister Midnight, Pure and Dingo The Wonder Dog and several others. So what of the sequel?

Well, Phoenix Tower is no more, and neither are the A-Men who have for better or worse all gone their separate ways. Dead City is in a poorer state than before. Take all the post-apocalyptical movies and books you have seen and read and cram them together until they reach critical mass and then pick at the deadly radioactive embers and it still won’t add up to the plot of The A-Men Return. And I should have added into that mix an unhealthy dose of computer games and graphic novels. Life in Dead City is barely worth living, but in some space stations not very far away things aren’t much better either as the super rich are succumbing to a virus, and their only hope may be something that is long-forgotten back on earth. Like it says on the tin, cue the return of the A-Men. As with the first book in the series we are treated to something that is vividly dark and savage which lashings of sex and violence and bad words that hurtles along to a climax or sorts that more than nicely sets up Forever A-Men, the final part of the trilogy. Can’t wait.