The Traitor�s Gate by Sarah Silverwood — book review

The Traitor’s Gate (The Nowhere Chronicles book 2) by Sarah Silverwood. Gollancz

Reviewed by Mark Yon

What we have here is the middle book of a fantasy trilogy, an adventure tale steeped in Young Adult tradition, reminiscent of John Masefield’s Box of Delights, Susan Cooper’s The Dark is Rising series (we even have a Dark King in this one) or Lewis’s The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe.

Our young protagonist, Finmere Tingewick Smith (thankfully, Fin for short) is at Orrery House with his friends Christopher Arnold-Mather and Joe Manning for Christmas, having rescued Tova the Storyholder and dispersed the Black Storm that lies between the worlds of here (The Somewhere) and an alternate London (The Nowhere.) in Book One (The Double Edged Sword.) Christopher has found that his father, Justin, was in league with the good-guy-turned-bad Commander of the Knights of Nowhere, St John Golden.

This time around, Fin, Joe and Chris find themselves involved in the initiation of new Knights to rebuild the Order and having to fend off Justin’s latest attempt to gain power and position. Along with their friend Mona from The Nowhere, the boys have to find out who is attacking people on London’s streets and why a crack in the Prophecy table is an evil omen.

It’s well written, in that the plot bounces along merrily pretty much from the start and the characters are logical and straightforward. There’s a nice contemporary feel to it, some vivid settings, a good shock about halfway through, and a building of tension to a cliff-hanger ending, no doubt leading to the next book in the series. The darker horrific elements will no doubt be attractive to any teenager who wants to be grossed out or pleasantly chilled.

Will this work for YA? Definitely, though older readers might feel a little short-changed. Nevertheless, if I were still a teenager ‘ great stuff.

The Traitor’s Gate (The Nowhere Chronicles book 2) by Sarah Silverwood. Gollancz

Reviewed by Mark Yon

What we have here is the middle book of a fantasy trilogy, an adventure tale steeped in Young Adult tradition, reminiscent of John Masefield’s Box of Delights, Susan Cooper’s The Dark is Rising series (we even have a Dark King in this one) or Lewis’s The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe.

Our young protagonist, Finmere Tingewick Smith (thankfully, Fin for short) is at Orrery House with his friends Christopher Arnold-Mather and Joe Manning for Christmas, having rescued Tova the Storyholder and dispersed the Black Storm that lies between the worlds of here (The Somewhere) and an alternate London (The Nowhere.) in Book One (The Double Edged Sword.) Christopher has found that his father, Justin, was in league with the good-guy-turned-bad Commander of the Knights of Nowhere, St John Golden.

This time around, Fin, Joe and Chris find themselves involved in the initiation of new Knights to rebuild the Order and having to fend off Justin’s latest attempt to gain power and position. Along with their friend Mona from The Nowhere, the boys have to find out who is attacking people on London’s streets and why a crack in the Prophecy table is an evil omen.

It’s well written, in that the plot bounces along merrily pretty much from the start and the characters are logical and straightforward. There’s a nice contemporary feel to it, some vivid settings, a good shock about halfway through, and a building of tension to a cliff-hanger ending, no doubt leading to the next book in the series. The darker horrific elements will no doubt be attractive to any teenager who wants to be grossed out or pleasantly chilled.

Will this work for YA? Definitely, though older readers might feel a little short-changed. Nevertheless, if I were still a teenager ‘ great stuff.